Category: Updates & Publications

King's College London

Updated List of Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur) Authorised Endorsing Bodies – June 2017

In June 2017, the list of authorised institutions for Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur) visa applications was updated by the Home Office.

The Tier 1 (Graduate Entrepreneur) route is for graduates who have an outstanding business idea that they wish to put into practice in the UK. Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) will have a central role in identifying graduates who have developed genuine and credible business ideas or entrepreneurial skills, and in endorsing and supporting them.

Only those institutions listed below are able to endorse graduates wishing to apply under this route:

  • Anglia Ruskin University
  • Arts University Bournemouth
  • Ashridge (Bonar Law Memorial) Trust
  • Aston University
  • Bangor University
  • Birmingham City University
  • Bishop Grosseteste University
  • Bournemouth University
  • BPP University Limited
  • Brunel University
  • Cardiff University
  • City University London
  • Coventry University
  • Cranfield University
  • De Montfort University
  • Edinburgh Napier University
  • Glasgow Caledonian University
  • Goldsmiths University of London
  • Heriot-Watt University
  • Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine
  • King’s College London
  • Kingston University
  • Lancaster University
  • Leeds Beckett University
  • Liverpool Hope University
  • Liverpool John Moores University
  • London Business School
  • London Metropolitan University
  • London School of Economics and Political Science London
  • South Bank University Loughborough University
  • Middlesex University
  • Newcastle University
  • Northumbria University
  • Newcastle Norwich University of the Arts Nottingham
  • Trent University
  • Oxford Brookes University
  • Plymouth University
  • Queen Mary University of London
  • Queen’s University of Belfast
  • Regent’s University
  • London Royal Academy of Music
  • Royal Agricultural University Royal Central School of Speech and Drama
  • Royal College of Art
  • Sheffield Hallam University
  • SOAS, University of London
  • Southampton Solent University
  • Swansea University
  • Teesside University
  • University College London
  • University for the Creative Arts
  • University of Aberdeen
  • University of Bath
  • University of Birmingham
  • University of Brighton
  • University of Bristol
  • University of Buckingham
  • University of Cambridge
  • University of Derby
  • University of Dundee
  • University of East Anglia
  • University of East London
  • University of Edinburgh
  • University of Essex
  • University of Exeter U
  • niversity of Glasgow
  • University of Greenwich
  • University of Hertfordshire
  • University of Huddersfield
  • University of Hull
  • University of Kent
  • University of Leeds
  • University of Leicester
  • University of Lincoln
  • University of Liverpool
  • University of Manchester
  • University of Northampton
  • University of Nottingham
  • University of Oxford
  • University of Portsmouth
  • University of Reading
  • University of Roehampton
  • University of Salford
  • University Of Sheffield
  • University of South Wales
  • University of Southampton
  • University of St Andrews
  • University of Stirling
  • University of Strathclyde
  • University of Sunderland
  • University of Surrey
  • University of Sussex
  • University of the Arts London
  • University of the West of England
  • University of the West of Scotland
  • University of Warwick
  • University of Westminster
  • University of Worcester
  • Guildhall School of Music & Drama

Full information is available on the UKVI web-site.

Leave to Remain under Tier 2 (General) Visa Category: Supplementary Work

An application for further leave to remain can be refused on many different grounds. Before applying for extension one must ensure awareness of all the rules and conditions.

Under Part 6A of the Immigration Rules, anyone can check the different set of circumstances that apply to these types of applications. In regard to this particular visa, the Tier2 (General), a future applicant has to pay attention to the paragraphs 245H to 245HH.

When referring to the more specific regulations or conditions, one may fall under the misinterpretation of the concept of “supplementary work”. While working for the sponsor for which the Certificate of Sponsorship was assigned it is possible, under a number of provisions, to perform a supplementary work.

The conditions upon an employment is considered supplementary are the following:

  1. The employment must be at the same profession and at the same professional level as the one for which the Certificate of Sponsorship was initially issued. This means that the Applicant cannot enjoy two different jobs that vary greatly in responsibilities as well as in expertise.
  2. It will not be deemed supplementary employment if to perform this new job the applicant leaves, abandons or stops operating the position for which the Certificate of Sponsorship was granted.
  3. Such voluntary extra work cannot exceed 20 hours per week. It takes place outside the hours set to work for your sponsor in the employment for which your Certificate of Sponsorship was assigned. The time and hours stated to work for the sponsor cannot be modified due to the activity of such supplementary work.

If all the above-mentioned rules are satisfied one can have this supplementary work along the one for which the Certificate of Sponsorship was assigned. In the matter, that you no longer work for the sponsor due to whatever reason (loss of the job, termination, bankruptcy of the company among others) or any of the conditions are no longer met. It is necessary to notify the Home Office what has changed within your personal situation.

The first step to take once these changes occur in your employment, is to report to the Home office about what has changed. Then, subsequently, submit a further application for leave to remain as well as a new Certificate of Sponsorship in order to stay in the United Kingdom under the new conditions.

UK border

May’s proposal – Analysis of the policy paper on the safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU

The recent proposal of Theresa May from June 26th, 2017 has been quoted as a ‘generous offer’ to EU citizens offering everyone who had acquired permanent residence a new ‘settled status’.

 

At the face value, it appears to be a good deal, however when one reads the small print it becomes apparent that there is no value in the offer, and it lacks the certainty that Theresa May continuously refers to. The offer has come after the EU Council Decision of 22nd May proposing their policy on safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, therefore both sides have now adopted their position. However, the UK’s offer is nowhere close to what EU would like to secure as a part of the exit deal.

 

The Government website provides a short summary of their ‘promise’.

 

“Since the result of the referendum last summer, the UK Government has made it absolutely clear how important it is that we secure as early as possible both the rights of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in EU member states. We are now seeking to provide EU citizens with certainty about their future by publishing a policy paper which sets out our offer to them.“

 

Theresa May has since triggering Article 50 made it clear that she wants nothing else but to provide the certainty for all EU citizens in the UK and for those Brits living in the Member States. However, the proposal offers no certainty and is lacking definitive answers and dates.

 

The UK continues to affirm that the rights of the EU nationals are protected and are to be complied with under the EU law until the official day of Brexit.

However, this gives little certainty as to the future rights of over 3 million EU citizens living in the UK even though the UK has proposed a new streamlined process for the European citizens to register in order to gain their new ‘settled status’ as per the generous offer of Theresa May.

 

This online application will apply to all EU citizens who have been continuously living in the UK for over 5 years. This requirement is the same as under current EU law where those with over 5 years of residence can apply for a document certifying permanent residence. Moreover, since the criteria that will apply are national, not based on EU law, the calculation of this period might differ. The proposals says ‘The type of application you’ll need to make will depend on your circumstances, when you moved to the UK and how long you’ve lived here’. The questions arise in terms of what type of circumstances an EU citizen needs to have in order to be able to stay?

 

While the UK promises to make the process as streamlined as possible for the EU citizens who already have the Permanent Residence Status, they will still need to apply for ‘settled status’ after Brexit in order to be able to remain in the UK. The UK position is that a document certifying permanent residence may mean nothing in the future. What is the reason for this? Does it mean that the future criteria will be certainty stricter?

 

Moreover, why the current permanent residence document under free movement rules is not sufficient to prove (for example, to employers or public service providers) that you have permission to continue living and working legally in the UK after Brexit. It seems that the criteria that are to be applied for the new ‘settled status’ will be much more stricter than under EU law if the Home Office cannot respect the now issued documents certifying permanent residence rights.

 

Further questions arise as to the cost of the new ‘settled status’.

Theresa May refers to a ‘reasonable’ cost but under the current British Immigration Rules the fee for indefinite leave to remain which is equivalent to the ‘settled status’ is set at £2,297. Will this be the price the EU nationals would have to pay in order to stay?

 

The offer gives some consideration to those citizens who will not qualify for ‘settled status’ as they will not complete their 5 years period before the ‘cut-off date’. However, nowhere in the proposal the date is mention. It may be the date of triggering Article 50 or the Brexit Day, but it could also potentially be historic.

If Theresa May wanted to give certainty to EU citizens she would have set the ‘cut-off date’. Those EU citizens who arrived and became resident before [un]specific date but who have not accrued five years’ will be able to apply for a temporary status. Moreover, those EU citizens that arrive after the [un]specified date will be allowed to remain in the UK at least temporary and may become eligible, however there should not have expectations of guaranteed settled status.

The proposal mentions ‘People who arrive after the cut-off date will be able to apply for a permission to remain after the UK leaves the EU, under the future immigration arrangements for EU citizens’.

What are the future immigration arrangements? Where is the certainty that Theresa May was offering?

 

The most troublesome part of the proposal is the lack of consideration for a Non-EU family members of EU nationals. What will happen with them since they no longer be able to live in the UK under the more lenient regulations of the EU. Those Non-EU nationals who have divorced their EU partners may also not be eligible to stay. The offer also fails to consider whether a UK citizen who currently is residing in Spain will retain their full free movement rights to move to Germany for example in the future.

 

Moreover, there is also no certainty as to what the ‘grace period’ will be for the EU citizens to apply for their new status. This will ‘be confirmed during negotiations’ and ‘if you haven’t received a document confirming your new immigration status by the end of this [again unspecified] period you will no longer have permission to remain in the UK. What if some EU citizens do not meet their future immigration requirements of which we have no mention whatsoever?

 

The UK offer fails to discuss the judicial enforcement, and while the EU wants the rights of EU nationals to be enforced by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), and the rules in the withdrawal agreement in accordance with pre-Brexit case law of the Court, the UK rules out the jurisdiction of the CJEU.

 

Much of the proposal uses words like ‘seek to ensure’ or ‘akin’ which does not by definition refer to certainty. It is clear that the UK position indisputably offers worse terms both for EU citizens in the UK and UK citizens in the EU. The EU proposal asked for the permanent residence documents to be respected without the need of ‘transferring’ of the status.

 

While the UK will exempt people from the requirement to have Comprehensive Sickness Insurance, it has been argued that the current UK law breaches EU law anyway. Therefore, it may seem like a ‘generous offer’ but in reality is nowhere close.

 

The proposal also is silent on British Citizenship, it does not mention anywhere how a ‘settled person’ can acquire British citizenship in the future. It only mentions that it will be possible. Does it mean that the criteria will be different and/or more expensive to those currently under EU law?

 

At the moment, it seems that the only way to completely guarantee your continued right to live and work in the United Kingdom is to become a British citizen. In order to do this, the first step is to acquire Permanent Residence.  Although, becoming a British citizen may also be a disadvantage for some nationals or if you have non-British family members living with you in the UK who are relying on your status under EU law. While, we are still awaiting a decision of CJEU in Lounes, the Advocate-General has said that non-EU nationals may be given the right to reside in a Member State in which an EU family member lived before the family member acquired the nationality of that country. However, since the UK wants to rule out the jurisdiction of the CJEU, there would be little time to benefit from any positive upcoming decision.

By Ilovetheeu (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Theresa May’s proposal – Analysis of the policy paper on the safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU

The proposal of Theresa May was quoted as a ‘generous offer’ to EU citizens offering everyone who had acquired permanent residence a new ‘settled status’.

At the face value, it appears to be a good deal, however when one reads the small print it becomes apparent that there is no value in the offer, and it lacks the certainty that Theresa May continuously refers to. The offer has came after the EU Council Decision of 22nd May proposing their policy on safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, therefore both sides have now adopted their position. However, the UK’s offer is nowhere close to what EU would like to secure as a part of the exit deal.

The Government website provides a short summary of their ‘promise’.

Since the result of the referendum last summer, the UK Government has made it absolutely clear how important it is that we secure as early as possible both the rights of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in EU member states. We are now seeking to provide EU citizens with certainty about their future by publishing a policy paper which sets out our offer to them.

Theresa May has, since triggering Article 50, made it clear that she wants nothing else but to provide certainty for all EU citizens in the UK and for those Brits living in other Member States. However, the proposal offers no certainty and is lacking definitive answers and dates.

The UK continues to affirm that the rights of the EU nationals are protected and are to be complied with under the EU law until the official day of Brexit.

However, this gives little certainty as to the future rights of over 3 millions EU citizens living in the UK even though the UK has proposed a new streamlined process for the European citizens to register in order to gain their new ‘settled status’ according to the ‘generous’ offer of Theresa May.

This online application will apply to all EU citizens who have been continuously living in the UK for over 5 years. This requirement is the same as under current EU law where those with over 5 years of residence can apply for a document certifying permanent residence. Moreover, since the criteria that will apply are national, not based on EU law, the calculation of this period might differ. The proposal says ‘The type of application you’ll need to make will depend on your circumstances, when you moved to the UK and how long you’ve lived here’. The questions arise in terms of what type of circumstances an EU citizen needs to have in order to be able to stay?

While, the UK promises to make the process as streamlined as possible for the EU citizens who already have Permanent Residence Status, they will still need to apply in order to be able to remain in the UK. The UK position is that anyone with the document certifying permanent residence may mean nothing in the future. What is the reason for this? Does it mean that the future criteria will be certainty more stricter?

Moreover, why the current permanent residence document under free movement rules is not sufficient to prove (for example, to employers or public service providers) that you have permission to continue living and working legally in the UK after Brexit. It seems that the criteria that are to be applied for the new ‘settled status’ will be much more stricter than under EU law if the Home Office cannot respect the now issued documents certifying permanent residence rights.

Also, what will be the cost of the new ‘settled status’? Theresa May refers to a ‘reasonable’ cost but under the current British Immigration Rules the fee for indefinite leave to remain which is equivalent to the ‘settled status’ is set at £2,297. Will this be the price the EU nationals would have to pay in order to stay?

The offer gives some consideration to those citizens who will not qualify for ‘settled status’ as they will not complete their 5 years period before the ‘cut-off date’. However, nowhere in the proposal the date is mention. It may be the date of triggering Article 50 or the Brexit Day, but it could also potentially be historic.

If Theresa May wanted to give certainty to EU citizens she would have set the ‘cut-off date’.

Those EU citizens who arrived and became resident before [un]specific date but who have not accrued five years’ will be able to apply for a temporary status. Moreover, those EU citizens that arrive after the [un]specified date will be allowed to remain in the UK at least temporary and may become eligible, however there should not have expectations of guaranteed settled status.

The proposal mentions ‘People who arrive after the cut-off date will be able to apply for a permission to remain after the UK leaves the EU, under the future immigration arrangements for EU citizens’. What are the future immigration arrangements? Where is the certainty that Theresa May was offering?

The most troublesome part of the proposal is the lack of consideration for a Non-EU family members of EU nationals. What will happen with them since they will no longer be able to live in the UK under the more lenient regulations of the EU. Those Non-EU nationals who have divorced their EU partners will also not be eligible to stay. The offer also fails to consider whether the UK citizen who currently is residing in Spain will retain their full free movement rights to move to Germany in the future.

Moreover, there is also no certainty as to what the ‘grace period’ will be for the EU citizens to apply for their new status. This will ‘be confirmed during negotiations’ and ‘if you haven’t received a document confirming your new immigration status by the end of this [again unspecified] period you will no longer have permission to remain in the UK.’ What if some EU citizens do not meet the future immigration requirements of which we have no mention whatsoever?

The UK offer fails to discuss the judicial enforcement, and while the EU wants the rights of EU nationals to be enforced by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), and the rules in the withdrawal agreement in accordance with pre-Brexit case law of the Court, the UK rules out the jurisdiction of the CJEU.

Much of the proposal uses words like ‘seek to ensure’ or ‘akin’ which does not by definition refer to certainty. It is clear that the UK position indisputably offers worse terms both for EU citizens in the UK and UK citizens in the EU. The EU proposal asked for the permanent residence documents to be respected without the need of ‘transferring’ of the status.

While the UK will exempt people from the requirement to have Comprehensive Sickness Insurance, it has been argued that the current UK law breaches EU law anyway. Therefore, it may seem like a ‘generous offer’ but in reality is nowhere close.

The proposal also is silent on British Citizenship, it does not mention anywhere how a ‘settled person’ can acquire British Citizenship in the future. It only mentions that it will be possible. Does it mean that the criteria will be different and/or more expensive to those currently under EU law?

At the moment, it seems that the only way to completely guarantee your continued right to live and work in the United Kingdom is to become a British citizen. In order to do this, the first step is to acquire Permanent Residence.  However, becoming a British citizen may also be a disadvantage for some nationals or if you have non-British family members living with you in the UK who are relying on your status under EU law. While, we are still awaiting a decision of CJEU in Lounes, the Advocate-General has said that non-EU nationals may be given the right to reside in a Member State in which an EU family member lived before the family member acquired the nationality of that country. However, since the UK wants to rule out the jurisdiction of the CJEU, there is a little time to benefit from the upcoming decision.

If you would like to find out more about your rights in the UK or apply for the Permanent Residence/British Citizenship you can contact Angelika at 020 7822 1866 or email: angelika@sterling-law.co.uk

Client Alert: New Application Status Check Service Introduced

The UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) is currently experiencing unprecedented increase in some application categories workload. According to the statistics, the most affected category is the European applications.

UKVI openly admits lack of caseworkers and staff in general and is, therefore, sometimes unable to make a decision within its published timeline of 15 working days for entry clearance applications, and 6 months for all the in-country applications. Sometimes UK Visas and Immigration notifies us or our clients that the delay occurred, but unfortunately in some cases no information is provided.

In such cases, Sterling and Law Associates LLP offers case status check service which helps evaluating the progress of the case. However, we find it necessary to mention that from the 1 June 2017, the UKVI imposed a levy of £5.48 for out of country application updates, which is to be paid by the applicants for every single enquiry.

If there are any questions or in case additional information is required, please do not hesitate to contact our office administration or your assigned caseworker for more details.

Check your application status online

We are pleased to confirm that it is now possible to check the status of your application directly with the Home Office.

Please follow this link: https://www.gov.uk/contact-ukvi-inside-outside-uk/y/inside-the-uk/application-status

If your application has been pending for more than 6 months we are able to submit a request on behalf of the client.

If your application is pending for a considerably longer period, we are able to chase the Home Office, complain to the relevant department and if needed complain to the Ombudsman depending on your circumstances.

Our sister solicitor company Sterling Lawyers is also able to offer judicial reviews services if the delays are unreasonable and unlawful.

Please contact Angelika Majchrowska at 020 7822 1866 or at angelika@sterling-law.co.uk if you have any queries or you contact your assigned caseworker directly.

In the meantime, we will continue to update you on the progress of your case accordingly.

 

Successful Asylum and Article 2& 3 ECHR Claim for Egyptian National

Tribunal Court Decision

The Appellant, and citizen of Egypt, appealed against the decisions to refuse to grant him asylum in the UK. The Appellant appealed on the grounds that he is a refugee and that to return him to Egypt would place the UK in breach of its obligations under Regulation 2 of the Refugee or Persons in need of International Protection Regulations 2006. The Appellant claims that he fears persecution on his return to Egypt on the basis that he is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood.

On the basis of the evidence provided by Sterling and Law Associates, the Court found that there was a reasonable degree of likelihood that the Appellant would be persecuted on return to Egypt. Therefore, the Court was satisfied that the Appellant had established a well-founded fear of persecution for the purposes of Regulation 2.

Additionally, Articles 2 and 3 of the ECHR fall within the Appellant’s asylum claim and, as such, removing him to Egypt would be contrary to the ECHR.

Appeal Allowed for Ukrainian on Proof Marriage was Genuine

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Another successful appeal for Sterling and Law Associates at the First-Tier Tribunals.

The Appellant, a citizen of Ukraine, made an application for entry to the UK to join her husband – who has indefinite leave to remain in the UK. The application was refused on the basis that the Entry Clearance Officer was not satisfied that the relationship was genuine and subsisting, concluding that the marriage was entered into to facilitate the Appellant’s return to the UK. Sterling and Law Associates appealed the decision of the Home Office on the basis that the marriage was genuine.

The Court agreed, noting evidence demonstrating the husband’s ongoing visits to Ukraine since his wife left as evidence of a genuine and subsisting relationship. Additionally, in the opinion of the Court, the fact the couple had a child together was significant evidence of a genuine and subsisting relationship.

Therefore, The Court held that, on the balance of probabilities, the relationship between the Appellant and her husband was genuine and subsisting and therefore the appeal was allowed.

Successful Appeal for Retained Right of Residence following Separation

First-tier tribunal

The Appellant, a citizen of Brazil, was refused the issue of a residence card under Regulation 10 (5) of the EEA Regulations 2006 on the basis that she had failed to demonstrate that she was exercising Treaty rights in the UK as though she was an EEA national since her daughter’s – who she was dependent on – divorce. Therefore, she had not retained her right of residence following the divorce and her application was refused.

However, the Court held the Respondent had not interpreted the requirements correctly. It was noted that the Appellant had demonstrated that she was the family member of a non-EEA national who satisfied Regulation 10 (6) (a) and therefore the Court found she meets the requirements for Regulation 10 (6) (b).

As such, the appeal was allowed under the Immigration (EEA) Regulations.

Lecture & Debate: Brexit & Future of the EU Nationals in the UK, 24 April 2017

EU Referendum Brexit

International Law and Human Rights Society of BPP University will host a lecture and debate on the immigration implications of Brexit for the EU nationals in the UK. The event is a free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Date and time:

Mon 24 April 2017 at 7.00 PM

Location:

BPP Waterloo Lecture Theatre (Ground floor), 137 Stamford St, London, SE1 9NN (MAP)

Agenda:

  1. Employment and Residence Rights of the EU nationals in the UK
  2. Permanent Residence applications
  3. Impact on non-EU spouses of the EU nationals
  4. Refusals and appeals
  5. New EEA Regulations
  6. Questions from audience and discussion

Speakers:

  • Julian Norman, Barrister, Immigration and Human Rights Expert (Drystone Chambers)
  • Ruslan Kosarenko, Partner, Immigration and Human Rights Advocate (Sterling and Law Associates LLP)

Registration:

To register for the event please submit your details via Eventbrite.

If you have enquiries please contact: contact@sterling-law.co.uk

Options for overseas companies that want to send a worker to the UK

London City Business Visitor

Representative of an overseas business

The options depend on whether a company has already started her business in the UK. In case when the company does not have a representative in the UK and wants to send a representative to start business in the UK, a worker should apply as a representative of an overseas business. The UK branch must run the same type of business, as the main overseas company.

This worker must be employed at the overseas company and have all operational powers regarding the UK branch, but he cannot be a majority shareholder of the main company. The representative must also meet the English language requirements to apply for the UK entry clearance.

Besides the language knowledge the worker should submit the documents proving the following facts for visa application:

  1. Employment

  2. Sufficient funds to maintain himself and any dependants

  3. Full information about the overseas company, its assets, accounts and share distribution for the previous year

  4. Information about the business to be started in the UK (e.g. business plan)

  5. Notarised statement from the company confirming intentions to start business in the UK and authorising the representative

  6. Notarised statement from the representative confirming his intention to represent the company in the UK and not to undertake any other business in the UK

The representative must remain to be employed by the overseas company. If he needs to be employed by the UK branch, he should apply for the sponsor’s licence under the Points Based System and change his immigration status to a sponsored worker.

Tier 2 Visa for Skilled Workers and Tier 5 Temporary Workers

If the company has already established business in the UK, they may sponsor the worker sent to the UK under a PBS sponsor’s licence. There are various types of sponsorship available, e.g. Tier 2 for skilled workers and Tier 5 for temporary workers. Tier 2 is the most commonly used type of sponsorship. The UK branch has to obtain a Tier 2 sponsor’s licence for skilled workers. To get it the company should be fully established and must submit the supporting documentation. Before applying for sponsor’s licence they should check that the worker’s role in the UK will be eligible for sponsorship and that he will be paid enough to meet the minimum required by the Home Office Codes of Practice.

Tier 1 (Entrepreneur) Visa

In case when a person has funds and wants to invest in the UK business, he should apply for Tier 1 (Entrepreneur) Visa, established for those, who want to start a new business in the UK or join an existing one, it is usually used for owner-run businesses. The entrepreneur would need to have £200,000 to invest in the UK business. He must also meet the maintenance requirements with funds held in a bank account in his name for a required period of time. There is also a “genuine entrepreneur” test to establish that intentions to start or join a business are genuine. This includes:

  1. Detailed business plan

  2. CV

  3. Proof of experience and skills to match the proposed business

The entrepreneur should also prove that he meets the English language requirement. Besides this, he should also meet various requirements during his stay in the UK under Tier 1 (Entrepreneur) visa. A person can enter under this visa to establish his business in the UK and then apply for a sponsor’s licence and switch to Tier 2 (General) after the licence has been approved and he has been sponsored.

Tier 1 (Investor) Visa

If a person has substantial funds to meet the financial requirements of the investor category and to invest in any business he may wish to undertake, this may be an option to apply for Tier 1 (Investor) visa. Investors are not restricted in the kind of business activity they can undertake in the UK, so this category can provide more flexibility in comparison to the entrepreneur category, although the overall investment commitment required is much higher.

Business Visit

The overseas company can also send a person to work as a business visitor in the UK for a short period of time. But this category does not allow to work in the UK and the business activities are limited.