Month: July 2019

CHILD IS ALLOWED TO JOIN HER MOTHER IN THE UK

Our client, a national of Uzbekistan, applied for indefinite leave to remain in the UK to join her mother, who was settled in the UK. Although the client was living in Uzbekistan with her grandparents, her mother while living in the UK had continued to provide financial care for her daughter as well as remaining responsible for the major decisions in her life.

 

In accordance with paragraph 297 of the Immigration Rules the requirements to be met by our client seeking indefinite leave to enter the United Kingdom as the child of a parent present and settled in the United Kingdom are that:

(e) this parent is present and settled in the United Kingdom and has had sole responsibility for the child’s upbringing.

 

 

The Home Office refused our client’s application on the basis that:

at the very least the client’s care had been shared between her mother and her grandparents (since she was living with them), as a result, her mother could not show sole responsibility.

 

An appeal was lodged with the First-tier Tribunal (IAC) against the refusal. While waiting for an appeal date, our client turned 18 years of age. However, this did not affect our client and Sterling Law successfully appealed the decision.

In view of all of the evidence submitted in support of the appeal, which was thoroughly prepared by Oksana Demyanchuk and her team, the judge found that

  • the sponsor [client’s mother] has had sole responsibility for the appellant;
  • that responsibility lasted for a significant period of time;
  • therefore, the appellant satisfies the provision of 297(i)(e) and the appeal should be allowed on the human rights grounds.

 

Thus, after around a year of uncertainty, our client is able to join his mother in the UK.

 

Contact us should you have any immigration-related question:

oksana@sterling-law.co.uk and michael@sterling-law.co.uk

+44 (0) 207 822 8535

You can also text us via facebook.

 

 

Exceptional Promise visa granted

Exceptional talent (Exceptional Promise) visa granted after the initial application was refused.

The first application was submitted under the exceptional talent category. After the refusal, our immigration lawyer Aliya suggested the client to re-apply under the Exceptional Promise category.

Aliya submitted satisfactory evidence with his application to be considered for fast track. The client got his endorsement within 3 weeks after submission which is quite fast considering that it could take up to 2 months.

If you want to know more details about the Exceptional Promise category, just let us know.

 

You can contact Aliya on

aliya@sterling-law.co.uk

+44 020 7822 8535

ARTICLE 8 APPEAL OUTSIDE THE IMMIGRATION RULES ALLOWED ON THE SPOT!

Our client, a citizen of the Russian Federation, came to the UK at the age of 12 to study. After graduating with a bachelor’s degree from a UK university, our client applied for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK under the ten-year continuous long Residency Rules.

The Home Office refused the application with no right of in-country appeal. The client’s previous legal representatives did not challenge this decision, at which point our client became an over-stayer as his continuous leave was broken. Instead, our client then applied for leave to remain based upon his private life. This application was refused on the grounds that our client did not satisfy requirements 276ADE of the Immigration Rules.

Immigration Rules 276ADE (1)

The requirements to be met by an applicant for leave to remain on the grounds of private life in the UK are that at the date of application, the applicant:

(i) does not fall for refusal under any of the grounds in Section S-LTR 1.1 to S-LTR 2.2. and S-LTR.3.1. to S-LTR.4.5. in Appendix FM; and

(ii) has made a valid application for leave to remain on the grounds of private life in the UK; and

(iii) has lived continuously in the UK for at least 20 years (discounting any period of imprisonment); or

(v) is aged 18 years or above and under 25 years and has spent at least half of his life living continuously in the UK (discounting any period of imprisonment); or

(vi) subject to sub-paragraph (2), is aged 18 years or above, has lived continuously in the UK for less than 20 years (discounting any period of imprisonment) but there would be very significant obstacles to the applicant’s integration into the country to which he would have to go if required to leave the UK.

 

After approaching numerous other lawyers, the client approached Sterling Law. Our lawyer, Oksana Demyanchuk and her team lodged an appeal with the First-tier Tribunal on the grounds that the decision was a breach of our client’s Article 8 ECHR human rights. In particular, the emphasis was placed on the fact that our client had established an extensive private life in the UK since his entry. After considering the grounds put forward and the bundle of documents provided in support of the appeal, the Judge allowed the appeal on a spot despite our client not meeting any of the Immigration Rules! In doing so, the Judge found that

the Home Office timing resulted in unfairness because it effectively prevented the appellant from benefiting from paragraph 276 ADE of the Immigration Rules when he had qualified for indefinite leave to remain.

 

Moreover, the Judge found that our client

  • has built up a significant private life in the United Kingdom;
  • has the English language skills of a native speaker;
  • is financially independent; and
  • It would be in public interest to retain him in the country.

Bearing the above in mind, it was held that any interference in the Appellant’s private life will result in unjustifiably harsh consequences.

 

Thanks to Oksana Demyanchuk and her team, our client can remain in the UK which already become a home for him.

 

Contact us should you have any immigration-related question:

oksana@sterling-law.co.uk and michael@sterling-law.co.uk

+44 (0) 207 822 8535

You can also text us via facebook.

AFTER FIVE REFUSALS CLIENT OBTAINED LEGAL IMMIGRATION STATUS IN THE UK

Our client, a national of Sierra Leone, came to the UK as a visitor. Since one of his family members was involved in political activities against the government our client feared for his life on return to Sierra Leone and decided to stay in the UK.

He applied, without legal representatives, for leave to remain on the medical grounds twice. However, these applications were refused.

After several years he applied for leave to remain on the human rights grounds. Again, the Home Office refused these human rights applications although our client had integrated into UK society, having lived here for over 16 years at the time of the last refusal. Moreover, for the last four years, he has been in a relationship with a British citizen and has established a close relationship with her British child from the previous relationship. They all lived together and our client cares for the child while his mother is at work.

 

Sterling Law successfully appealed the last Home Office refusal. In reaching his decision the Judge stressed that:

The welfare of the minor child of this family is a primary consideration in my deliberations. The child is British, entitled to the benefits of his citizenship, which include living in Britain and having access to its education, health and social care systems. Moreover, the child enjoys regular direct contact with his biological father that would be lost if the child has to leave the UK.

 

It follows that it is not reasonable and to remove our client from the UK as he is one of the main carers for the qualifying child. Thus, the Judge allowed the appeal on the human right grounds.

 

Thanks to Sterling Law, the client finally obtained legal immigration status in the UK after over 10 years fighting for his rights with the Home Office.

 

Contact us should you have any immigration-related question:

+44 (0) 207 822 8535

contact@sterling-law.co.uk

DRUG CONTROL POLICEMAN GRANTED ASYLUM IN THE UK

Our client worked in the Police Force for several years. He was involved in investigating cases against a number of high profile individuals as well as arrests of police officers who had links to organised crime and the Mafia. After one of such investigations, our client had been attacked on his way home. Then, his home had been broken into. Later on, our client found out that the person in whose arrest he was involved had been released from prison without charge. After that, the police unit our client had worked in had subsequently been closed down.

As a result of these activities, our client left his country of origin, where he would likely to face arrest and ill-treatment. Obtaining a visa, he arrived in the UK and claimed asylum. After arrival to the UK, our client even received a summons notifying him of criminal proceedings against him.

However, the Home Office refused his asylum claim stating that many facts are speculative and our client:

Had failed to show a sustained or systemic failure in State protection on the part of the authorities in his country of origin if he were to be returned.

 

It was at this point that the client approached Sterling Law and, due to the work of Oksana Demyanchuk and her team, sufficient evidence was provided to convince the Judge that:

 

the State in the country of origin would not be able to provide adequate protection to the appellant.

 

Thus, the Judge found that our client has a well-founded fear of persecution in his country of origin and:

 

his removal would cause the United Kingdom to be in breach of its obligations under Qualification Rules and under the 1950 Convention.

 

The Appeal was allowed and our client obtained refugee status in the UK.

 

Contact us should you have any immigration-related question:

oksana@sterling-law.co.uk and michael@sterling-law.co.uk

+44 (0) 207 822 8535

You can also text us via facebook.

STERLING LAW WON ANOTHER ‘MARRIAGE OF CONVENIENCE’ CASE

Sterling Law is proud to stand for the rights of families not to be separated by the faulty actions and decisions of Immigration Officers.

 

Our client, a national of Georgia, was refused an EEA residence card on the grounds that her marriage is not genuine. The Home Office relied heavily on three facts in making the decision:

    1. Our client’s poor immigration history:
      • she overstayed her visit visa and was working illegally in the UK;
      • she was detained 2 months before her marriage and later released on bail.
    1. An Immigration Officer’s visit to our client’s previous address.
    2. Our client’s failure to attend marriage interviews.

Nevertheless, Sterling Law successfully appealed this decision. Despite several inconsistencies in the evidence of the appellant and the sponsor about certain aspects of their life together and our client’s poor immigration history, the Judge was satisfied that the marriage is genuine. Thus, the appeal was allowed.

 

In Sterling Law, we know how disappointing it is for a genuine couple to receive a visa refusal on the grounds that the Home Office believes your marriage is a sham. Contact us should you have this problem.

 

Tel. +44 (0) 207 822 8535

Email: josephine@sterling-law.co.uk      contact@sterling-law.co.uk

Or book consultation here.

DOMESTIC WORKER GRANTED SUBSEQUENT LEAVE TO REMAIN OUTSIDE OF THE IMMIGRATION RULES

Can a domestic worker in a private household establish a family life with the family they work with?
If Oksana Demyanchuk is dealing with your case, then yes!

 

Our client, a Russian national, has been working as a nanny for a family, since the birth of their first child five years ago. When the family moved to the UK, our client obtained a six-month domestic worker in a private household visa to accompany them to the UK and continue her employment as the family’s nanny.

As a nanny to the children, our client spent a significant amount of time with them since their birth and has become incredibly close to the children. One of the children who has several health issues has built a particularly trusting relationship with our client.

Due to the particular circumstances of the family, our client’s support of the family is vital. By the time our client’s leave to remain was due to expire our client’s support to the family was irreplaceable.

However, from April 2012 the Immigration Rules does not allow domestic worker visa holders to extend their stay in the UK beyond a total six-month limit.

 

Therefore, our client applied for leave to remain on the basis of her human rights, in particular, her right to private and family life in the UK.

 

The Home Office refused to accept that family life between our client and her employers and their children existed for the purposed of Article 8 ECHR. Accordingly, an appeal was lodged with the First-tier Tribunal.

At the appeal, on the grounds and documents advanced by Oksana Demyanchuk, the Judge found that

There are no hard and fast rules as to what constitutes family life within the compass of Article 8. And thus, given the nature of the dependency, family life exists in this case for the purpose of Article 8.

 

Moreover, the Judge accepted that more than normal emotional ties exist between the Appellant and the family and the refusal to grant our client leave to remain is disproportionate and constitutes a breach of her Article 8 ECHR rights. Thus, the appeal was allowed.

 

Contact us should you have any immigration-related question:

oksana@sterling-law.co.uk and michael@sterling-law.co.uk

+44 (0) 207 822 8535

You can also text us via facebook.

ELDERLY Mother PERMITTED to stay in the UK with her British adult daughter

Excellent news! Adult dependent relative appeal allowed on the spot by the First-tier Tribunal (Immigration and Asylum Chamber).

Our client, a Ukrainian national, came to the UK on a visit visa to visit her daughter and grandchildren, who are British nationals. While being in the UK, she was diagnosed with dementia which made it impossible for her to return to her home in Eastern Ukraine.

On the advice of her previous representatives, she made an asylum claim in the UK, which was refused by the Home Office.

Throughout that process, our client health continued to rapidly deteriorate, so she applied by herself to remain in the UK with her daughter, who was her primary, and only, carer. This application was also refused by the Home Office and so our client contacted Oksana Demyanchuk to appeal the decision.

Accordingly, a notice of appeal was lodged on the grounds that the refusal of our client’s application breached her Article 8 Human Rights.

At the appeal hearing, on the basis of the evidence and submission put forward by Oksana Demyanchuk, the Judge accepted that:

  • our client has very serious health issues and is incapable of performing safe day to day self-care;
  • our client’s British daughter provides her with round the clock personal care and support all the time and this care is irreplaceable;
  • our client’s medical condition presents a very significant obstacle to her integration into Ukraine;
  • after the death of her husband our client has no close family members in Ukraine who can provide her with necessary care;

Thus, the Judge allowed the appeal on the human rights grounds (article 8 ECHR) concluding that

This is one of those exceptional cases where the Appellant’s removal from the United Kingdom would be unjustifiable harsh.

 

Should you have any immigration related question please do not hesitate to contact us on oksana@sterling-law.co.uk and michael@sterling-law.co.uk.

Or call us: +44 (0) 207 822 8535

GRANDMOTHER CAN STAY IN THE UK WITH GRANDCHILD SUFFERING FROM AUTISM

Our client, a Ukrainian national, came to the UK many years ago on a visit visa and has stayed here since then. She lives with her daughter and her granddaughter who has been diagnosed with severe autism. Due to the child’s particular needs, our client provides round the clock care to her granddaughter for many years. She applied for leave to remain under Article 8 ECHR but the application was refused.

The Home Office stated that our client does not meet the Rules and the daughter could be helped by local authority care.

 

Sterling Law successfully appealed this refusal outside the Immigration Rules on the Human Rights grounds.

The judge adopted the entire skeleton argument from our lawyers as his own findings and accepted that:

  • The granddaughter has formed the closest bond with her grandmother;
  • The child has a very complex set of very special needs;
  • The grandmother fulfils a parental role in upbringing her granddaughter;
  • The Social Worker cannot find any replacement for Granny;
  • It would be extremely cruel to take the central figure away from the child and the removal would be disproportionate in terms of both private and family life.

Thus, the Judge allowed the appeal on the Human Rights grounds. Our client not only obtained legal status in the UK but also got a chance to remain with her granddaughter and continue to provide her with necessary support and love.

 

Contact us should you have any immigration related question:

+44 (0) 207 822 8535

contact@sterling-law.co.uk

EXCELLENT NEWS: ASYLUM GRANTED!

Our client, a Georgian national, came to the UK to seek asylum.  After a fire incident on his family’s business property, our client was targeted by Georgian authorities to stop investigating the fire and subsequent suicide of one of his family members. Fearing for his life in Georgia, our client entered the UK and made a claim for asylum. However, his application was refused. He lodged an appeal with the previous legal representatives to obtain refugee status in the UK.

A refugee is any person who, inter alia, owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion,
• is outside of the country of his nationality and
• is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country.

 

This asylum appeal was very complex, and previous representatives withdrew from the case, leaving the client without legal protection. At this stage, Sterling Law was instructed by the client. The case received from previous solicitors was underprepared and underrepresented. Thanks to our lawyer Nozima Rakhimjonova, the appeal was allowed on asylum grounds and Articles 2 (right to life) and 3 (prohibition of torture) ECHR. Considering the appeal, the Judge accepted that our client:

  • was targeted by the Georgian authorities suffering injuries as a result of it;
  • is at risk on return to Georgia due to lack of effective investigation and legal redress there.

Thus, our client can remain in the UK without fearing for his life.

 

Asylum appeals of this nature can be very complex and the success can depend on the quality of representations. Therefore, we would strongly advise that any asylum seekers in the UK seek professional legal advice.

Contact us:

+44 (0) 207 822 8535

contact@sterling-law.co.uk