Appeal Allowed on Family and Private Life

Oksana Demyanchuk and her team had yet more success in the First-tier Tribunal with an appeal allowed on human rights grounds, specifically the right to family and private life.

The clients’ arrived in the UK in 2002 and have lived here since. After having a child in the UK they made an application for leave to remain in the UK on the basis of their family and private life established in the UK.

The application was refused by the Home Office and an appeal was lodged to the First-tier Tribunal. The Home Office refused the application on the basis that it was proportionate for the clients and their young child to leave to the UK.

However, based on the evidence provided evidence by Sterling & Law Associates LLP, the Judge found that it would be unreasonable for the child to leave the UK in accordance with section 117 (B)(6) of the Immigration Act 2014, which reads as follows:

Article 8: public interest considerations applicable in all cases

(1) The maintenance of effective immigration controls is in the public interest.

(2) It is in the public interest, and in particular in the interests of the economic well-being of the United Kingdom, that persons who seek to enter or remain in the United Kingdom are able to speak English, because persons who can speak English—

(a)are less of a burden on taxpayers, and

(b)are better able to integrate into society.

(3) It is in the public interest, and in particular in the interests of the economic well-being of the United Kingdom, that persons who seek to enter or remain in the United Kingdom are financially independent, because such persons—

(a)are not a burden on taxpayers, and

(b)are better able to integrate into society.

(4) Little weight should be given to—

(a)a private life, or

(b)a relationship formed with a qualifying partner, that is established by a person at a time when the person is in the United Kingdom unlawfully.

(5) Little weight should be given to a private life established by a person at a time when the person’s immigration status is precarious.

(6) In the case of a person who is not liable to deportation, the public interest does not require the person’s removal where—

(a)the person has a genuine and subsisting parental relationship with a qualifying child, and

(b)it would not be reasonable to expect the child to leave the United Kingdom.

 

And paragraph 276 ADE of the Immigration Rules, which reads as follows:

Requirements to be met by an applicant for leave to remain on the grounds of private life

276ADE (1). The requirements to be met by an applicant for leave to remain on the grounds of private life in the UK are that at the date of application, the applicant:

(i) does not fall for refusal under any of the grounds in Section S-LTR 1.2 to S-LTR 2.3. and S-LTR.3.1. to S-LTR.4.5. in Appendix FM; and

(ii) has made a valid application for leave to remain on the grounds of private life in the UK; and

(iii) has lived continuously in the UK for at least 20 years (discounting any period of imprisonment); or

(iv) is under the age of 18 years and has lived continuously in the UK for at least 7 years (discounting any period of imprisonment) and it would not be reasonable to expect the applicant to leave the UK; or

(v) is aged 18 years or above and under 25 years and has spent at least half of his life living continuously in the UK (discounting any period of imprisonment); or

(vi) subject to sub-paragraph (2), is aged 18 years or above, has lived continuously in the UK for less than 20 years (discounting any period of imprisonment) but there would be very significant obstacles to the applicant’s integration into the country to which he would have to go if required to leave the UK.

 The Judge allowed the appeal on human rights grounds.