Tag: Brexit

Legal impact of ‘Brexit’ on the United Kingdom

The result of the British referendum, also known as the EU referendum, established a new reality, in which almost 52% of the British voted for “Leave” the European Union membership. However, the official withdrawal from the EU is planned in March 2019. Terms and conditions of ‘Brexit’ still remain unknown, but it obviously will be impossible to avoid significant changes in laws, regulations, taxes, court jurisdictions, whatever form ‘Brexit’ will take.

One of the AI legal companies has performed an interesting investigation using technical tools to measure the impact of hard ‘Brexit’ on British law. The results were overwhelmingly impressive.

    • Approximately 12% of UK case law will fall under reckless risk in comparison with the last year due to EU legal issues that became part of the UK cases.

    • Nearly 40-50% of UK Supreme Court judgements involve EU law, which clearly indicates that UK Supreme Court base its decisions on EU law, from which over

6% of UK Supreme Court decisions were entirely based on EU law.

This was a complex research, which involved over 300,000 cases to be analyzed on the subject of EU law influence on the British court system. Provided statistical results raise a considerable degree of uncertainty. However, data analysis obtained by using machine learning techniques serves as a progressive tool which can objectively improve the law.

Brexit may lead to the situation where EU case law, which British courts referred to before, will be invalid. This opens an enormous gap in the litigation area. Nobody knows how long it will take to replace the legal framework and judicial system in particular. The truth is that it may be very complicated to dispose of EU law, which along the decades has deeply rooted into the UK domestic legal system.

EU Settlement Scheme will Open to Public from 21 January 2019

EU citizens living in the UK who have a valid passport will be able to take part in a public test phase of the EU Settlement Scheme.

From 21 January 2019, EU citizens, as well as their non-EU citizen family members who hold a valid biometric residence card, will be able to apply for the immigration status they will need once the UK has left the EU. By applying during this test phase, they will also provide valuable insight into how the system is performing so that further improvements can be made before the scheme is fully rolled out from March 2019.

EU Settlement Scheme Details

The public testing follows a successful private beta phase with employees in higher education, health and social care sectors.

The EU Settlement Scheme will be fully open by 30 March 2019, and EU citizens will have until 30 June 2021 to apply, in line with the draft Withdrawal Agreement.

The expansion has been announced through changes to the Immigration Rules. The Rules are accompanied by some initial findings of how the scheme performed during the second private beta test phase. Feedback during that phase, which ends on 21 December 2018, has so far been positive.

By 13 December 2018, more than 15,500 applications had been made and more than 12,400 of these had been concluded. 71% of the concluded applications were granted settled status and the rest were granted pre-settled status. Many of the applicants received their decision within 24 hours. We will publish a full report in January 2019.

The new, wider test phase will again require applicants to prove their identity by using the EU Exit: Identity Document Check app which is part of the integrated online application process. There will also be support for EU citizens who might need additional help in making their application.

Read further information on the EU Settlement Scheme.

Upper Tribunal establishes a new Derivative Right of Residence under EU Law for Family Members of British Citizens

In the recently reported case of LS v SSHD (Article 45 TFEU – derivative rights) [2018] UKUT 00426 (IAC) concerning the free movement rights of British citizens who live in the UK but travel frequently to other Member States of the EU for business purposes, the Upper Tribunal held that a third country national family member of such British citizens may be able to establish a derivative right of residence under Article 45 of the TFEU.

Ultimately in this case, it was found that two British citizens would be realistically in danger of being unable to continue their employment in the UK which required them to travel frequently in the EU should their family member, a third country national, be unable to provide childcare.

New Derivative Right

This is a significant step in the interpretation of EU rights to free movement in the UK. The derivative right which is established by this judgment sets a precedent in upholding the rights of British citizens to exercise free movement rights in the EU.

The appellant in this case is a Russian national who entered the UK for the purpose of visiting her daughter and son-in-law, both British citizens, who had recently had their first child. The employment of both British citizens required them to travel very frequently to other EU countries. Several months into the appellant’s visit, when her daughter was looking to return to work but struggling to make alternative childcare arrangements, it became evident that the appellant’s presence was indispensable due to the child’s complex care needs. Without the appellant fulfilling the role of caring for her grandchild, neither her daughter nor her son-in-law could continue to travel as required by their respective employments.

The Upper Tribunal accepted the position set out in the ECJ’s judgment in S & G (C-457/12)(S v Minister voor Immigratie, Integratie en Asiel and Minister voor Immigratie, Integratie en Asiel v G), that a third country national could establish a derivative right of residence in the Member State of which their family member is a national, if they meet the following criteria:

  • They are a family member of a Member State national within the terms of the Citizens’ Directive
  • Their family member must be exercising treaty rights (travelling regularly to other Member States for professional purposes falls within the scope of exercising treaty rights under Article 45 of the TFEU)
  • If it were not for the presence of the third country national family member, an absence of adequate childcare for the child of the Member State national would discourage them from exercising treaty rights

The Upper Tribunal noted particularly the threshold of the requirement that the British citizen would be dissuaded from exercising treaty rights.

In many such cases, it would clearly be preferable for the child to be cared for by a family member rather than any alternative such as a nanny or au pair, not least because it would be in the best interests of the child. However, it was held that this would not be enough to establish the dissuasive element. The Tribunal would need to undertake a wide evaluative assessment of the particular childcare needs. Moreover, adequate and reasonable steps would need to have been taken to obtain alternative childcare. The interference with the British citizen’s exercise of treaty rights must be real and there must be a causal link between the absence of adequate childcare and such interference.

Reported so soon before the UK is expected to leave the EU, this judgment throws up an interesting point regarding the current rights of British citizens which are afforded by EU free movement.

It is difficult to conceive of domestic UK legislation upholding the rights of British citizens to undertake professional activities abroad in order to maintain their UK employment, where they are at risk of being discouraged from doing so by difficult family circumstances, such as an absence of adequate childcare arrangements.

It is suggested that perhaps some more progressive immigration provisions will be required in future to address the problem that British families may face an economic crisis or be prevented from engaging in an increasingly global workplace in order to uphold the safety or security of their children. Perhaps these measures are needed even to provide sufficient motivation for such British families to continue living in the UK.

For more details and comments please on this case and its implications, please feel free to get in touch directly with Josephine Smith and Ruslan Kosarenko

 


UK Immigration & Legal Assistance

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular immigration case and to inquire about the immigration and legal fees, please contact our immigration lawyers on Tel. +44(0) 20 7822 8599, Mobile / Viber: +44 (0) 73 0584 8477, e-mail: contact@sterling-law.co.uk or via our online appointment booking form.

Brexit Update: EU Settlement Scheme Trial starts on 28 August 2018

Statement of changes to the Immigration Rules introducing new EU Settlement Scheme has been approved by the Parliament and comes into force on 28 August 2018 for the purposes of initial trial.  

This Statement of Changes in Immigration Rules introduces a new Appendix EU to the Rules to provide for applications by resident EU citizens and their family members for leave to remain in the United Kingdom under the EU Settlement Scheme.

Following the Government’s Statement of Intent on the EU Settlement Scheme, released on 21 June 2018, the Procedure on Biometric Enrolment and the Immigration and Nationality (Fees) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 were also laid before the Parliament.

EU Settlement Scheme under new Appendix EU

Appendix EU will provide a basis on which resident EU citizens and their family members, and the family members of certain British citizens, can apply for leave to remain in the UK under UK immigration law.

Where resident EU citizens and their family members are concerned, this is in line with the draft Withdrawal Agreement with the European Union published on 19 March 2018 and will not affect their existing rights derived from EU law.

The EU Settlement Scheme will provide the mechanism for resident EU citizens and their family members, and the family members of certain British citizens, to apply on a voluntary basis for the UK immigration status which they will require to remain in the UK beyond the end of the planned post-exit implementation period on 31 December 2020.

More details on the settled status for the EU citizens and their family members

Effective Date & Trial

Appendix EU comes into force on 28 August 2018, for the purposes of an initial trial of the EU Settlement Scheme.

The trial  will involve the participation on a voluntary basis of:

  • persons on the payroll of the 12 NHS Trusts, and
  • enrolled students and persons on the payroll of the three Universities (Liverpool Hope University,
    Liverpool John Moores University, and The University of Liverpool).

The Immigration and Nationality (Fees) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 also comes into force on 28 August 2018. The EU Settlement Scheme will be rolled out on a phased basis from late 2018.

The scheme will be fully open by 30 March 2019.

EU Settlement Scheme Provisions

  • EU citizens and their family members who, by 31 December 2020, have been continuously resident in the UK for five years will be eligible for ‘settled status’ (indefinite leave to remain in the UK).
  • EU citizens and their family members who arrive by 31 December 2020, but will not by then have been continuously resident in the UK for five years, will generally be eligible for ‘pre-settled status’ (five years’ limited leave to remain in the UK), enabling them to stay until they have reached the five-year threshold. They can then also apply for settled status.
  • Close family members (a spouse, civil partner, durable partner, dependent child or grandchild, and dependent parent or grandparent) living overseas will be able to join an EU citizen resident here after 31 December 2020, where the relationship existed on that date and continues to exist when the person wishes to come to the UK. Provision for future children will be made, in line with the draft Agreement.

Family Members of British Citizens

It has been also decided, as a matter of domestic policy, that a family member of a British citizen who is lawfully resident in the UK by 31 December 2020 by virtue of regulation 9 of the EEA Regulations, will be eligible to apply for status under the EU Settlement Scheme contained in Appendix EU.

Legal Assistance

EU SETTLEMENT SCHEME DETAILS
BREXIT UPDATES
New Fees: British Passport Applications
How to Apply for British Passport Online 
Apostille and Document Certification in London
Employment Rights in the UK

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular case and relevant immigration law requirements, please contact our immigration lawyers on tel. +44(0) 20 7822 8535, mobile: 07305848477 or by e-mail: contact@sterling-law.co.uk or via our online appointment booking form.

Settled Status for EU Citizens and Family Members in the UK after Brexit

Today, the Home Secretary, Sajid Javid announced more details on the settled status for the EU citizens and their family members. In the official electronic notification, the Home Secretary stated that safeguarding the rights of EU citizens in the UK has always been the first priority and the agreement reached with the EU earlier this year did just that. The rights that EU citizens and their families currently have are protected which include access to healthcare, benefits and pensions.

Away from the negotiations, my team in the Home Office have been working hard to develop the service that you’ll use to get your settled status. This work will continue as we make sure that the system and processes are rigorously tested and meet every requirement ahead of the launch. Sajid Javid

According to the statement, the scheme will open later this year and the Home Office is on track to open the scheme fully by 30 March 2019. The deadline for applications to the scheme will be 30 June 2021.

More details of the suggested scheme including overview, eligibility requirements and application process have been released on the government’s website.

Settled Status Scheme for EU citizens and their family members living in the UK

The scheme will open fully by March 2019. The deadline for applying will be 30 June 2021. You may be able to apply after this date if you’re joining a family member in the UK.

Rights for citizens of Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzerland are still being negotiated.

Getting settled status means you can continue to live and work in the UK for as long as you like. It will mean you’re eligible for:

  • public services, such as healthcare and schools
  • public funds and pensions
  • British citizenship, if you meet the requirements

Full details of the scheme are still subject to approval by Parliament.

Eligibility

To be eligible for settled status, you’ll need to:

  • be an EU citizen, or a family member of an EU citizen
  • have been living in the UK continuously for 5 years (‘continuous residence’)
  • have started living in the UK by 31 December 2020

If you’ve lived in the UK for less than 5 years, you’ll generally be eligible for ‘pre-settled status’ instead.

If you’re a non-EU citizen, you will need to show your relationship to an  EU citizen living here.

Continuous residence

Continuous residence means you’ve been in the UK for at least 6 months in each of those 5 years, except for:

  • one period of up to 12 months for an important reason (for example, to work or study)
  • compulsory military service

If you will not have 5 years’ continuous residence when you apply

You’ll generally get ‘pre-settled status’ instead. Pre-settled status means you can stay in the UK for a further 5 years. You can live and work here, and will have access to public funds and services on the same basis as you do now.

Once you have 5 years’ continuous residence you can apply for settled status.

Applying for settled status

The scheme will open fully by March 2019.

The deadline for applying will be 30 June 2021. You may be able to apply after this date if you’re joining a family member in the UK.

The application form will be online. You’ll be able to get support over the phone or in person if you need help doing things online.

Necessary Documents

When you apply, you’ll need proof of:

  • your identity
  • your residence in the UK, unless you have a valid permanent residence document or valid indefinite leave to remain
  • your relationship to a family member from the EU living in the UK, if you’re from outside the EU

Fees

The fee to apply (subject to approval by Parliament) will be:

  • £65 if you’re 16 or over
  • £32.50 if you’re under 16

It’ll be free to apply if:

  • you already have valid indefinite leave to remain or a valid permanent residence document
  • you’re applying to move from pre-settled status to settled status
  • you’re a child in local authority care

There will be support for the vulnerable and those without access to a computer.

Legal Assistance

 

New Fees: British Passport Applications
How to Apply for British Passport Online 
Apostille and Document Certification in London
Employment Rights in the UK

 

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular case and relevant immigration law requirements, please contact our immigration lawyers on tel. +44(0)20 7822 8535, mobile: 07305848477 or by e-mail: contact@sterling-law.co.uk or via our online appointment booking form.

Brexit negotiation update for EU citizens

An official update has been circulated by the Home Office as Brexit negotiations continue. This is the latest information on the status of EU citizens in the UK.

During the week of 19-23 March 2018, the UK and the EU have reached an agreement on what happens during the period immediately after Brexit, known as the implementation period. This is important as it will give citizens and businesses on both sides time to adjust before a new relationship with the EU is agreed.

So, what has been agreed so far and how will you be affected?

Brexit: EU citizens currently in the UK

The agreement on citizens’ rights reached in December has now been formalised into a draft Treaty text, meaning it is in the right form to be written into law.

The agreement means that if you are an EU citizen living in the UK before the UK leaves the EU on 29 March 2019 you will be able to continue to live and work in the UK. Your rights to healthcare, work arrangements and access to benefits will continue. Also, your existing close family members will be able to join you in future in the same way that they can now. You can read more here: Status of EU citizens in the UK: what you need to know.

From this week, EU citizens in the UK have been seeing digital adverts encouraging you to ‘stay informed’. The activity is part of an ongoing effort by the Government to build awareness about the agreement to protect EU citizens’ rights ahead of the roll-out of the settlement scheme.

Settlement scheme

If you are an EU citizen or family member already living in the UK, a user-friendly scheme to enable you to secure your settled status here will open later this year. But there is no rush – you will have up until 30 June 2021 to make your application.

The UK government will provide more information on the scheme and how to apply in the coming months.

Implementation period

The agreement we reached with the EU this week extends the citizens’ rights protections above to include EU citizens and their family members arriving in the UK during the implementation period (from 30 March 2019 to 31 December 2020). This ensures that those planning to come to the UK after March next year know what the arrangements will be. During this time, new arrivals will need to register through a new Home Office registration scheme after three months in the UK.

More information is available at UK leaving the EU: what you need to know.

Leaving the EU – Impact on Human Rights: Conference Summary Report

Sterling & Law Associates LLP were delighted to attend and participate in a high-level conference “Leaving the EU – Impact on Human Rights” organised by New Europeans[1], together with the European Association for the Defence of Human Rights (AEDH)[2], Britain in Europe[3] and Brunel University Knowing Our Rights project[4], and held in London on 16 March 2018 at Europe House

The event was organised to discuss the potential impact that Brexit would have on a number of our individuals’ rights and examine areas of human rights under threat for EU citizens and UK citizens.

The conference shed some light on key contentious areas such as workers’ rights, data protection, and family life among others. These are increasingly important topics to discuss as we move nearer and nearer towards the exit date of UK from the EU, especially when those in charge fail to provide specific indications into the details of these niche areas.

Brexit implications for human rights

There is a great fear that Brexit will lead to the regression of many of our rights. In the current state, a number of our fundamental rights derive from the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) and the European rules, regulations and directives. The Withdrawal Bill that proposes to implement Brexit could seek to remove several of those rights. For instance, in terms of employment law, the EU sits at the heart of workers’ rights[5] having brought about greater health and safety regulations that reduced the number of work days loss to absences and sick days, bringing about equal pay for equal value work and ensuring our right to parental leave. The Withdrawal Bill could possibly see the removal of these rights.

Data Protection Concerns

When it comes to data protection[6], the General Data Protection Regulation[7] (GDPR) proposed by the EU that comes into force on 25 May 2018, which has been implemented in the UK through the Data Protection Act, could lose all strength and meaning following Brexit. From an immigration perspective, the Data Protection Act includes an exception to the regulation for ‘effective immigration enforcement’. This means that if an individual is suspected of breaching immigration controls, the Home Office and other governmental agencies would be able to obtain and use personal data, that had been collected for purposes unrelated to immigration, to make a decision in regard to an individuals’ immigration status. This exemption could also mean that the Home Office would not be obliged to respond to Subject Access Requests (SARs) from people who wish to know what data has been held in relation to their previous immigration applications or situations at border controls. This is distressing because SARs are often used by legal practitioners to acquire necessary information to advise their clients on their specific circumstances, particularly when their clients do not have a clear record of their previous situations. Brexit could mean that the UK could get away with including such a wide-ranging exception into the legislation.

Photo by New Europeans

 

Family and private life

The conference also delved deeper into the impact that Brexit would have on our family and private life[8]. Research and analysis is currently being carried out into the effects on different categories of families. In the UK, 12% of all children born in the UK have at least one parent that is from the EU. After the referendum, there has been a sharp increase in the number of EU citizens in the UK applying for permanent residence applications and citizenship applications. However, while it might give you some peace of mind before the exit, the permanent residence card or document certifying permanent residence will not be considered valid after Brexit. EU citizens in the UK and their family members will have to reapply for a ‘settled’ status in the UK. However, as the exact details and processes are yet to have been announced, the rights of the EU citizens in the UK and those of UK citizens abroad in other EU countries have not been guaranteed. Brexit is seeking to remove EU citizens’ and their families’ free movement and automatic rights within the UK and create an entirely new system that has yet to be executed.

These alarming possibilities after Brexit gives rise to the question, as brought up by a participant at the conference, of whether the stripping of our access to these rights given to us through the EU would amount to an infringement of our human rights in itself.

Despite what has been mentioned in this article, no one knows for certain what is going to happen to our human rights after Brexit, let alone anything else relating to the UK, EU and Brexit, but it is important to keep updated on the news to ensure that we are all prepared for the big change coming our way.

Throughout the entire conference, it has been evident that Brexit has and will bring about an unjustifiable amount of uncertainty into our lives. This uncertainty underlines the discussion with ifs, doubts and questions that cannot be answered with a simple response. It is clear that the complexity of the matter, namely what effect Brexit will have on our fundamental human rights, cannot be easily resolved. However, what we can take away from this event is that there are several organisations and individuals that are currently fighting to ensure that our intrinsic human rights are not infringed.

It is our goal at Sterling & Law Associates LLP to help individuals and families to navigate this complex area of law and to keep EU nationals updated on any changes that may affect their life.

References:

[1] New Europeans is a civil rights organisation that campaigns for freedom of movement, non-discrimination and the principle of solidarity in Europe. This is done by giving a platform to European and non-EU citizens a voice in local communities to join and take part in the Europe-wide debate regarding the challenges that we are currently faced with.

[2] AEDH is a European network of over 30 individual and organisation members to defend and promote human rights in the EU.

[3] Britain in Europe is a think tank based at Brunel University London that brings together academics, legal practitioners, and human rights NGOs across Britain and Europe to conduct research and influence public policy.

[4] The project aims to provide analysis and insight into understanding the impact and application of the European Convention on Human Rights in the UK.

[5] This topic was discussed by Hannah Reed from the Trades Union Congress (TUC).

[6] This topic was discussed by Gracie Bradley from Liberty, a UK human rights and civil liberties campaign group.

[7] The GDPR was proposed to unify data protection rules for individuals within the EU. It seeks to protect personal data that is stored on computers or filing systems for example by ensuring that organisations that hold your personal information need to notify you if they share it and be transparent about how they process and use that personal information. The reason why this regulation is seen to be a move forward in this area is that there are real risks that can arise from non-compliance such as fines of up to 2% – 4% of the company’s global turnover.

[8] This topic was discussed by Dr. Nando Sigona from the Institute for Research into Superdiversity at the University of Birmingham.

UK’s proposed administrative procedures for EU citizens obtaining settled status

Today, on 7 November 2017, the Home Office circulated a public update on the administrative procedures underpinning the UK’s proposals for a streamlined application system for EU citizens obtaining settled status.

The text of the Home Office’s circular is quoted below.

“Today, the Government has set out further details of how the new settled status scheme for EU citizens and their family members will operate as the UK leaves the EU.

In a technical document sent to the European Commission as part of the negotiations, the Government reiterates how the new system will be streamlined, low-cost and user-friendly, with EU citizens consulted on its design.

EU citizens applying to stay in the UK after Brexit will have plenty of time, up to two years after the UK has left the EU, to obtain settled status. Those applying to stay in the UK after we leave the EU will not have their applications refused on minor technicalities and caseworkers considering applications will exercise discretion where appropriate. The new system will minimise the documentary evidence required and EU citizens will not be required to provide fingerprints as part of the application process.

Decisions will be based solely on the criteria set out in the Withdrawal Agreement, with no discretion for other reasons for refusal. EU citizens will also be given a statutory right of appeal, in line with their current rights through the Free Movement Directive, if their application is unsuccessful.

The Prime Minister has been clear that safeguarding the rights of EU citizens living in the UK and UK nationals in Europe is the first priority for negotiations and she said last month that an agreement is within touching distance.

Negotiation between the UK and EU is continuing and the next talks will take place this week on 9 and 10 November. We will continue to keep you updated on further progress.”

Prime Minister pledges to secure simple process to swap current EU Permanent Residence status for UK settled status

Today, on 19 October 2017, ahead of the EU Council meeting, Theresa May wrote directly to EU citizens in the UK. In her message, the Prime Minister pledged to make it as easy as possible for EU citizens to remain in the UK after Brexit. She insisted that the application process for settled status in the UK would be “streamlined” and the cost “as low as possible”. For any EU citizen who holds Permanent Residence status under the current EU regulations, there will be a simple process introduced to swap their current status for the UK settled status.

Full text of the Prime Minister’s message is quoted below.

“As I travel to Brussels today, I know that many people will be looking to us – the leaders of the 28 nations in the European Union – to demonstrate we are putting people first.

I have been clear throughout this process that citizens’ rights are my first priority. And I know my fellow leaders have the same objective: to safeguard the rights of EU nationals living in the UK and UK nationals living in the EU.

I want to give reassurance that this issue remains a priority, that we are united on the key principles, and that the focus over the weeks to come will be delivering an agreement that works for people here in the UK, and people in the EU.

When we started this process, some accused us of treating EU nationals as bargaining chips. Nothing could have been further from the truth. EU citizens who have made their lives in the UK have made a huge contribution to our country. And we want them and their families to stay. I couldn’t be clearer: EU citizens living lawfully in the UK today will be able to stay.

But this agreement will not only provide certainty about residence, but also healthcare, pensions and other benefits. It will mean that EU citizens who have paid into the UK system – and UK nationals into the system of an EU27 country – can benefit from what they’ve put in. It will enable families who have built their lives together in the EU and UK to stay together. And it will provide guarantees that the rights of those UK nationals currently living in the EU, and EU citizens currently living in the UK will not diverge over time.

What that leaves us with is a small number of important points to finalise.  That is to be expected at this point in negotiations. We are in touching distance of agreement.  I know both sides will consider each other’s proposals for finalising the agreement with an open mind. And with flexibility and creativity on both sides, I am confident that we can conclude discussions on citizens’ rights in the coming weeks.

I know there is real anxiety about how the agreement will be implemented. People are concerned that the process will be complicated and bureaucratic, and will put up hurdles that are difficult to overcome. I want to provide reassurance here too.

We are developing a streamlined digital process for those applying for settled status in the UK in the future. This process will be designed with users in mind, and we will engage with them every step of the way.  We will keep the cost as low as possible – no more than the cost of a UK passport. The criteria applied will be simple, transparent and strictly in accordance with the Withdrawal Agreement.  People applying will not have to account for every trip they have taken in and out of the UK and will no longer have to demonstrate Comprehensive Sickness Insurance as they currently have to under EU rules.

And importantly, for any EU citizen who holds Permanent Residence under the old scheme, there will be a simple process put in place to swap their current status for UK settled status.

To keep development of the system on track, the Government is also setting up a User Group that will include representatives of EU citizens in the UK, and digital, technical and legal experts. This group will meet regularly, ensuring the process is transparent and responds properly to users’ needs. And we recognise that British nationals living in the EU27 will be similarly concerned about potential changes to processes after the UK leaves the EU.  We have repeatedly flagged these issues during the negotiations. And we are keen to work closely with EU Member States to ensure their processes are equally streamlined.

We want people to stay and we want families to stay together. We hugely value the contributions that EU nationals make to the economic, social and cultural fabric of the UK. And I know that Member States value equally UK nationals living in their communities. I hope that these reassurances, alongside those made by both the UK and the European Commission last week, will provide further helpful certainty to the four million people who were understandably anxious about what Brexit would mean for their futures.”

Safeguarding the status of citizens: negotiation update from the Home Office

On 13 October 2017, the Home Office circulated an update following the fifth round of the negotiation between the EU and UK.

Full text of the circular: 

“We are closer to agreeing all elements of the rights of EU citizens living in the UK and the reciprocal rights of UK citizens living in the EU – but there is more discussion required.

On key issues, such as the broad framework of residence rights for EU citizens and their family members, social security entitlements and reciprocal healthcare, the UK and EU have largely reached agreement.

On remaining areas, both the UK and EU are focussing on providing certainty for citizens as quickly as possible. Discussions this week have narrowed the focus to the key remaining issues for negotiations.

The UK has also provided further information on its settled status scheme to be introduced next year. It will be streamlined, digital and low cost. As we have said previously, you do not need a document now to prove that you are resident in the UK.

For those who already have EU permanent residence documents the process will be very straightforward, with greatly reduced or zero cost to applicants to update their status under the new scheme.

The talks also explored ways to fulfil the Prime Minister’s commitment to implement the Withdrawal Treaty fully into UK law, ensuring consistent interpretation through UK courts being able to take into account CJEU judgements.

We want to reach agreement on all areas as soon as we can, providing certainty for citizens.

The EU Council is meeting next week to discuss whether or not there has been sufficient progress in the current talks to move onto discussion of wider issues. Whatever the EU Council’s decision, safeguarding the status of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU will remain a priority for the UK. As the Prime Minister said this week, “we want you to stay”.

Our negotiating position continues to be based on the proposal we outlined in June: safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, withupdates provided as the negotiations progress.”