Tag: EEA Applications

UK right of residence granted to Belarusian national after he divorced his EEA partner

Refusal rate seems to be particularly high in the immigration cases. This includes right of residence applications. Applicants then need to appeal against the Home Office decision, which is another procedural nightmare.

Retained Right of Residence in the UK after Divorce

Belarussian national divorced from his EEA National spouse in 2014. He still, however, had family ties in the UK (his brother was settled in the country).

Our client sought to retain his right of residence after separation from his partner – EU national. He had been fighting for 4 years before positive decision was achieved.

After the divorce was finalised in 2014, the client submitted an application to retain his right of residence (as per Regulation 10 of the EEA Regulations 2016). It was, however, refused because there was no enough evidence confirming that his ex-partner was working in the UK from the date the divorce petition was sent until the date his divorce was finalised.

He appealed against this decision and the appeal was dismissed as how the Judge said

“the Appellant had not shown he had made every effort to provide the required documents”

of his partner exercising the Treaty Rights at the date of the divorce. He only provided evidence up to the date the petition was sent.

Therefore, our client submitted another retain right of residence application in 2016 which was refused. The Home Office repeated the previously made decision as they still did not believe the EEA National to be exercising free-movement rights in the UK at the time of divorce. Then, we submitted EEA PR application in 2017 which was also refused based on the same grounds.

Senior solicitor, Shakir Hussain, assisted by immigration lawyer, Aliya Rimshelis, appealed against this decision and submitted evidence to court as

the refusal was contrary to the determination in our precedent-setting case Baigazieva vs Secretary of State for the Home Department [2018] EWCA. There it was provided that the EEA National ex-spouse need only be exercising treaty rights until the date of the initiation of the divorce proceedings.

Right of residence appeal, however, was complicated by difficult family circumstances our client faced.

In the midst of his appeal he had to leave the UK to support his mother in Belarus, who was undergoing cancer treatment. He, however, needed to return to the UK, to be present as a witness to his own appeal hearing. Our client applied for a Visitor visa, which was also refused.

Nevertheless, the judge was satisfied with the provided evidence and submissions that we helped to obtain, and the appeal was successful.

For more details on application of the UK immigration rules and EEA Regulations, please contact us directly:

Shakir Hussain, Senior solicitor

Email: shakir@sterling-law.co.uk

Phone: +44 (0) 20 7822 8535

 

Aliya Rimshelis, Corporate Immigration Lawyer

Email: aliya@sterling-law.co.uk

Phone: +44 (0) 20 7822 8535

 

UK Immigration Assistance

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular immigration case and to enquire about the immigration and legal fees, please contact our immigration lawyers on Tel. +44(0)20 7822 8535, Mobile / Viber: +447463382838, or via our online appointment booking form.

Brexit Update: EU Settlement Scheme Trial starts on 28 August 2018

Statement of changes to the Immigration Rules introducing new EU Settlement Scheme has been approved by the Parliament and comes into force on 28 August 2018 for the purposes of initial trial.  

This Statement of Changes in Immigration Rules introduces a new Appendix EU to the Rules to provide for applications by resident EU citizens and their family members for leave to remain in the United Kingdom under the EU Settlement Scheme.

Following the Government’s Statement of Intent on the EU Settlement Scheme, released on 21 June 2018, the Procedure on Biometric Enrolment and the Immigration and Nationality (Fees) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 were also laid before the Parliament.

EU Settlement Scheme under new Appendix EU

Appendix EU will provide a basis on which resident EU citizens and their family members, and the family members of certain British citizens, can apply for leave to remain in the UK under UK immigration law.

Where resident EU citizens and their family members are concerned, this is in line with the draft Withdrawal Agreement with the European Union published on 19 March 2018 and will not affect their existing rights derived from EU law.

The EU Settlement Scheme will provide the mechanism for resident EU citizens and their family members, and the family members of certain British citizens, to apply on a voluntary basis for the UK immigration status which they will require to remain in the UK beyond the end of the planned post-exit implementation period on 31 December 2020.

More details on the settled status for the EU citizens and their family members

Effective Date & Trial

Appendix EU comes into force on 28 August 2018, for the purposes of an initial trial of the EU Settlement Scheme.

The trial  will involve the participation on a voluntary basis of:

  • persons on the payroll of the 12 NHS Trusts, and
  • enrolled students and persons on the payroll of the three Universities (Liverpool Hope University,
    Liverpool John Moores University, and The University of Liverpool).

The Immigration and Nationality (Fees) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 also comes into force on 28 August 2018. The EU Settlement Scheme will be rolled out on a phased basis from late 2018.

The scheme will be fully open by 30 March 2019.

EU Settlement Scheme Provisions

  • EU citizens and their family members who, by 31 December 2020, have been continuously resident in the UK for five years will be eligible for ‘settled status’ (indefinite leave to remain in the UK).
  • EU citizens and their family members who arrive by 31 December 2020, but will not by then have been continuously resident in the UK for five years, will generally be eligible for ‘pre-settled status’ (five years’ limited leave to remain in the UK), enabling them to stay until they have reached the five-year threshold. They can then also apply for settled status.
  • Close family members (a spouse, civil partner, durable partner, dependent child or grandchild, and dependent parent or grandparent) living overseas will be able to join an EU citizen resident here after 31 December 2020, where the relationship existed on that date and continues to exist when the person wishes to come to the UK. Provision for future children will be made, in line with the draft Agreement.

Family Members of British Citizens

It has been also decided, as a matter of domestic policy, that a family member of a British citizen who is lawfully resident in the UK by 31 December 2020 by virtue of regulation 9 of the EEA Regulations, will be eligible to apply for status under the EU Settlement Scheme contained in Appendix EU.

Legal Assistance

EU SETTLEMENT SCHEME DETAILS
BREXIT UPDATES
New Fees: British Passport Applications
How to Apply for British Passport Online 
Apostille and Document Certification in London
Employment Rights in the UK

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular case and relevant immigration law requirements, please contact our immigration lawyers on tel. +44(0) 20 7822 8535, mobile: 07305848477 or by e-mail: contact@sterling-law.co.uk or via our online appointment booking form.

Appeal allowed after a lengthy long-distance relationship reunited

Sterling Law have successfully represented a client in a complex appeal case, and helped to challenge the Home Office’s refusal of our client’s EEA Family Permit application.

In the present case, the Home Office sought to argue that the marriage between the appellant and her EEA national spouse was “a marriage of convenience”, contracted for the sole and predominant purpose of gaining an immigration advantage. The Home Office was not satisfied with the applicant’s evidence submitted, such as their marriage certificate.

Moreover, the fact that there is a substantial age gap between the couple, the Home Office further suspected the scum marriage.The application to join as a family member of the EEA was then refused by the Home Office, subsequently an appeal was prepared by Sterling Law based on the  evidence, which shows the frequency of travelling of the sponsor to the home country of the appellant, photographs, supporting letters from close friends and family.

The Appeal was allowed, and the Immigration Judge noted that the sponsor had given credible evidence, supported by the documents prepared.

Should you have any further questions, or think any of the above may apply to your matter, please do not hesitate to contact us directly:

 

Nollienne Alparaque 

Email: nollienne@sterling-law.co.uk

Tel. +44 (0) 20 7822 8535

Mob. +44 (0) 0781276 9389

Immigration Assistance

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular immigration case, please contact our immigration lawyers on Tel. +44(0)20 7822 8535, Mobile / Viber: +447463382838, or via our online appointment booking form.

Appeal allowed after Home Office refuses EEA Residence Card for Brazilian National

A new successful case came out recently after the decision by the First-tier Tribunal.

The case concerned a family couple, where a Brazilian national married an EEA national. The appellant entered the UK, with the EEA national, on the basis of her Brazilian marriage certificate. Subsequently, the wife applied for a residence card as a family member of the EEA national and were refused by the Home Office.

Sterling Law appealed the decision of the Home Office, who considered their marriage to be one of convenience and, therefore, refused the residence card and ordered the appellant’s removal from the UK.

The refusal was based on the fact that the marriage certificate was not sufficient proof of the existence of a genuine marriage, or relationship.

The couple were expected to provide evidence of financial ties and cohabitation throughout their relationship. Further issues arose on the day when the Home Office team visited the couple’s property, which the appellant shared with her husband and parents-in-law.

Immigration lawyer, Nollienne Alparaque acted on behalf of the client and clarified that when the Home Office team visited the appellant’s property, there was miscommunication between the officers and the appellant’s friend, who spoke very little English, and could not properly confirm the name of the appellant’s spouse. Moreover, there was no any evidence reporting the visit by the Home Office team.

As to the alleged lack of financial ties, it has been argued that the appellant could not open a bank account, because the Home Office had her passport.  The couple had demonstrated active communication through Facebook, phone calls and messages before they got married in Brazil.

To conclude, the decision of the Home Office to refuse the residence card was found not to be in accordance with the EEA Regulations 2016, and the appellant was entitled to the residence card as an EEA family member.

Immigration Assistance

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular immigration case, please contact our immigration lawyers on Tel. +44(0)20 7822 8535, Mobile / Viber: +447463382838, by e-mail: contact@sterling-law.co.uk or via our online appointment booking form.

Settled Status for EU Citizens and Family Members in the UK after Brexit

Today, the Home Secretary, Sajid Javid announced more details on the settled status for the EU citizens and their family members. In the official electronic notification, the Home Secretary stated that safeguarding the rights of EU citizens in the UK has always been the first priority and the agreement reached with the EU earlier this year did just that. The rights that EU citizens and their families currently have are protected which include access to healthcare, benefits and pensions.

Away from the negotiations, my team in the Home Office have been working hard to develop the service that you’ll use to get your settled status. This work will continue as we make sure that the system and processes are rigorously tested and meet every requirement ahead of the launch. Sajid Javid

According to the statement, the scheme will open later this year and the Home Office is on track to open the scheme fully by 30 March 2019. The deadline for applications to the scheme will be 30 June 2021.

More details of the suggested scheme including overview, eligibility requirements and application process have been released on the government’s website.

Settled Status Scheme for EU citizens and their family members living in the UK

The scheme will open fully by March 2019. The deadline for applying will be 30 June 2021. You may be able to apply after this date if you’re joining a family member in the UK.

Rights for citizens of Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzerland are still being negotiated.

Getting settled status means you can continue to live and work in the UK for as long as you like. It will mean you’re eligible for:

  • public services, such as healthcare and schools
  • public funds and pensions
  • British citizenship, if you meet the requirements

Full details of the scheme are still subject to approval by Parliament.

Eligibility

To be eligible for settled status, you’ll need to:

  • be an EU citizen, or a family member of an EU citizen
  • have been living in the UK continuously for 5 years (‘continuous residence’)
  • have started living in the UK by 31 December 2020

If you’ve lived in the UK for less than 5 years, you’ll generally be eligible for ‘pre-settled status’ instead.

If you’re a non-EU citizen, you will need to show your relationship to an  EU citizen living here.

Continuous residence

Continuous residence means you’ve been in the UK for at least 6 months in each of those 5 years, except for:

  • one period of up to 12 months for an important reason (for example, to work or study)
  • compulsory military service

If you will not have 5 years’ continuous residence when you apply

You’ll generally get ‘pre-settled status’ instead. Pre-settled status means you can stay in the UK for a further 5 years. You can live and work here, and will have access to public funds and services on the same basis as you do now.

Once you have 5 years’ continuous residence you can apply for settled status.

Applying for settled status

The scheme will open fully by March 2019.

The deadline for applying will be 30 June 2021. You may be able to apply after this date if you’re joining a family member in the UK.

The application form will be online. You’ll be able to get support over the phone or in person if you need help doing things online.

Necessary Documents

When you apply, you’ll need proof of:

  • your identity
  • your residence in the UK, unless you have a valid permanent residence document or valid indefinite leave to remain
  • your relationship to a family member from the EU living in the UK, if you’re from outside the EU

Fees

The fee to apply (subject to approval by Parliament) will be:

  • £65 if you’re 16 or over
  • £32.50 if you’re under 16

It’ll be free to apply if:

  • you already have valid indefinite leave to remain or a valid permanent residence document
  • you’re applying to move from pre-settled status to settled status
  • you’re a child in local authority care

There will be support for the vulnerable and those without access to a computer.

Legal Assistance

 

New Fees: British Passport Applications
How to Apply for British Passport Online 
Apostille and Document Certification in London
Employment Rights in the UK

 

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular case and relevant immigration law requirements, please contact our immigration lawyers on tel. +44(0)20 7822 8535, mobile: 07305848477 or by e-mail: contact@sterling-law.co.uk or via our online appointment booking form.

Sterling Law sets precedent with Baigazieva [2018] EEA Retained Rights Case in the Court of Appeal

Baigazieva [2018] EWCA Civ 1088 is a case of Sterling Law that is an important new precedent on EEA retained rights of residence. The decision, given by Singh LJ of the Court of Appeal, has served a positive outcome to the appeal brought from the Upper Tribunal against the Home Office’s contention that the Appellant’s former spouse was not exercising treaty rights at the point of their divorce.

In doing so, the decision has also shed light by giving a new direction to a previously ambiguous interpretation of law under Article 10(5) of the EEA Regulations 2006, now revoked and replaced by EEA Regulations 2016.

Background: EEA Retained Rights of Residence

The Appellant, Ms. Baigazieva, applied for retained rights of residence on the basis that she was a former family member of an EEA national who was exercising treaty rights at the time of divorce after which she was residing in the UK as a qualified person.

The Home Office, notwithstanding the fact that she was previously issued a residence card as a family member of a qualified person, refused the application on the grounds that she did not provide sufficient evidence that she has retained a right of residence following divorce from an EEA national in accordance with Regulation 10(5) of the Immigration (EEA) Regulations 2006. Inclusive to the the issue of sufficient evidence not being provided, was the contention that the former spouse of the Appellant was not exercising treaty rights at the point of divorce.

Legal Issue

As such, the appeal turns on the correct interpretation of Regulation 10(5) of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2006 (“the 2006 Regulations”). On 9 December 2015, when the Secretary of State the appellant’s application for a residence permit as a family member with a retained right of residence, the 2006 Regulations were still in force. However, on 1 February 2017, the 2006 Regulations were revoked and replaced by the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016 (subject to transitional provisions) (“the 2016 Regulations”).

This case has set a much-needed precedence for both ongoing retained rights of residence applications and appeals, as well as applicants hoping to apply for retained rights of residence as former spouses of an EEA national exercising treaty rights in the UK.

This is a right that has subsisted since 2004 under the Directive of the European Parliament and of the Council of April 2004 (Directive 2004/38/EC) which ordains that it is a right of citizens of the Union and their family members to move and reside freely within the territory of the Member States. Article 13(2) of the Directive provides for third country family members of EU citizens to retain their right to reside in an EU Member State in the event of divorce and is supplemented by Regulation 10 of the EEA Regulations 2006 (and now 2016) which lays out the conditions under which a family member may retain a right of residence.

Accordingly, subsection (5) of Regulation 10 provides that a person satisfies the conditions in this paragraph if –

  • He ceased to be a family member of a qualified person on the termination of marriage or civil partnership of the qualified person;
  • he was residing the United Kingdom in accordance with these Regulations at the date of the termination;
  • he satisfies the condition in paragraph (6)
  • either –
  • prior to the initiation of the proceedings for the termination of the marriage or the civil partnership the marriage or civil partnership had lasted for at least three years and the parties to the marriage or civil partnership had resided in the United Kingdom for at least one year during its duration.

Until this decision was made an ambiguity persisted on the interpretation of the law under Regulation 10(5) in which it was unascertained whether a third country national ex-spouse is required to show that their former spouse was exercising Treaty rights in the host Member state at the time of their divorce (note that it is at the time of the divorce and not having acquired the divorce, the decree absolute) in order to retain a right of residence under Article 13(2) of Directive 2004/38/EC. This is despite the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) giving an answer to that question in 2014 in the context of domestic abuse, which was that the EU spouse, as the qualified person, must reside in the host member state until the date of the commencement of the divorce proceedings.

Thereby, the general implication here was that it was not necessary for the EU spouse to reside in the host Member State until the divorce itself was granted. Though at the EU level, such a determination has not, until this Baigazieva [2018] decision, been made in the UK despite the Secretary of State admitting that the issue has arisen in several proceedings in recent years without definitively being resolved.

Success – SSHD Concedes Appeal

As such, the Secretary of State for the Home Office not only conceded the appeal in the public interest so that the court to give a substantive judgement on the issue of law which arises but the this appeal also prompted the SSHD to accept that a third country national, or order to retain a right to reside in the UK in reliance of Regulation 10(5), does not need to show that their former EEA spouse exercised treaty rights as a “qualified person” until the divorce, the decree absolute, itself. Rather, it is sufficient to show that the former EEA spouse exercised treaty rights until divorce proceedings were commenced.

Singh LJ, the presiding judge of this Upper Tribunal appeal delivered a substantive judgment and concluded that the Upper Tribunal Judge erred in the approach she took to Regulation 10(5) of the 2006 Regulations. Ultimately, this judgement which finds that a third country national has to show their former spouse was a qualified person at the point of the initiation of divorce proceedings rather than at the point of divorce, now sets precedent for succeeding cases on the same matter.

The legal representatives of this case were Counsel, Agatha Patyna, from Doughty Street Chambers acting for the Appellant upon the instructions of the Appellant’s legal representative, Nadia Pylypchuk (as supervised by Ruslan Kosarenko) from Sterling Law.

Immigration Assistance

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular immigration case, please contact our immigration lawyers on Tel. +44(0)20 7822 8535, Mobile / Viber: +447463382838, by e-mail: contact@sterling-law.co.uk or via our online appointment booking form.

 

 

 

Rights of Former Husband of an EEA National Restored after Refusal and Revocation of Residence Card

Our client, a citizen of Ukraine, applied for a retained right of residence on the basis that he is a former husband of an EEA National who was exercising treaty rights at the time of divorce and subsequent to divorce he has been residing in the United Kingdom as a qualified person.

The marriage lasted for three years and both the client and his ex-wife have been residing in the United Kingdom.

The reason for the refusal was based on insufficient evidence of retaining rights of residence following the divorce from the wife according to regulation 10(5) of the Immigration (EEA) Regulations 2006.

In particular, the Home Office was concerned as to whether the ex-wife’s business was genuine and economically active. Based on this reason the Home Office revoked the residence card of the client.

Following the decision of the Home Office, the client instructed Sterling and Law Associates LLP to lodge the appeal on his behalf based on the breach of the rights under the Community Treaties, s 84(1)(d) Nationality, Immigration & Asylum Act 2002. In addition, it was claimed that the decision of the Home Office was unlawful under section 6 and 8 of the Human Rights Act 1998.

During the appeal hearing, the Immigration Judge considered all the evidence and submissions made by Sterling & Law Associates LLP on behalf of the client and noted that the sole issue in the matter was whether the Appellant’s ex-wife was exercising her treaty rights at the date of divorce.

The Judge confirmed that concerns as to the discrepancies in the documents of the ex-wife’s company as a genuine trading business were not sufficient to justify the Home Office’s position.

The appeal was allowed under Article 8 of the ECHR on the human rights grounds.

The casework in this successful appeal case was managed by the Immigration lawyer, Oksana Demyanchuk, who ensured that our client can continue his stay in the United Kingdom in accordance with his retained rights.

Immigration Assistance

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular immigration case, please contact our immigration lawyers on Tel. +44(0)20 7822 8535, Mobile / Viber: +447463382838, by e-mail: contact@sterling-law.co.uk or via our online appointment booking form.

Brexit negotiation update for EU citizens

An official update has been circulated by the Home Office as Brexit negotiations continue. This is the latest information on the status of EU citizens in the UK.

During the week of 19-23 March 2018, the UK and the EU have reached an agreement on what happens during the period immediately after Brexit, known as the implementation period. This is important as it will give citizens and businesses on both sides time to adjust before a new relationship with the EU is agreed.

So, what has been agreed so far and how will you be affected?

Brexit: EU citizens currently in the UK

The agreement on citizens’ rights reached in December has now been formalised into a draft Treaty text, meaning it is in the right form to be written into law.

The agreement means that if you are an EU citizen living in the UK before the UK leaves the EU on 29 March 2019 you will be able to continue to live and work in the UK. Your rights to healthcare, work arrangements and access to benefits will continue. Also, your existing close family members will be able to join you in future in the same way that they can now. You can read more here: Status of EU citizens in the UK: what you need to know.

From this week, EU citizens in the UK have been seeing digital adverts encouraging you to ‘stay informed’. The activity is part of an ongoing effort by the Government to build awareness about the agreement to protect EU citizens’ rights ahead of the roll-out of the settlement scheme.

Settlement scheme

If you are an EU citizen or family member already living in the UK, a user-friendly scheme to enable you to secure your settled status here will open later this year. But there is no rush – you will have up until 30 June 2021 to make your application.

The UK government will provide more information on the scheme and how to apply in the coming months.

Implementation period

The agreement we reached with the EU this week extends the citizens’ rights protections above to include EU citizens and their family members arriving in the UK during the implementation period (from 30 March 2019 to 31 December 2020). This ensures that those planning to come to the UK after March next year know what the arrangements will be. During this time, new arrivals will need to register through a new Home Office registration scheme after three months in the UK.

More information is available at UK leaving the EU: what you need to know.

Successful appeal against refusal to issue Residence Card to Spouse of EEA national

The case resolved around a refusal by the Secretary of State (Respondent) to issue an EEA Residence Card to a Georgian national (Appellant) who is a spouse of an EEA national.

The reason for the refusal was that the Respondent was not satisfied that the relevant EEA national exercised Treaty rights.

The Home Office argued that there were discrepancies in evidence of work, relying on the case of Begum Pakistan [2011] UKUT 275. However, the Judge did not accept the Home Office’s argument, finding that the evidence provided was sufficient, and that the witness statements were credible, including the ones describing the EEA national’s employment circumstances and history in the UK.

As a result, the Appellant’s spouse was determined to be a worker for the purposes of the EEA Regulations, and the Appellant has successfully discharged the burden of proof.

Accordingly, the appeal was allowed.

UK Visa Fees

UK Visa Fees from 6 April 2018

A number of changes to the UK visa fees will come into effect from 6 April 2018.

The key changes to the Home Office fees are outlined below:

  • Increased UK visa fees on growth routes (work, study and visit) by 4%.
  • Increased fees on most non-growth routes (nationality, settlement, family) and most associated premium services by 4%.
  • The fee for the overseas optional ‘Priority Visa’ service for entry clearance will increase by 15%.

The government has not made any changes to fees under the sponsorship system. UK visa fees for entry clearance to enter the Channel Islands and Isle of Man will rise in line with fee changes seen in the rest of the UK.

UK visa fees for all applications made from outside and within the UK

TYPE OF APPLICATION

FEE, GBP 

Outside / Inside UK before 6 April 2018

FEE, GBP

Outside / Inside UK after 6 April 2018

Tier 1 Investor £1,561 £1,623
Tier 1 Entrepreneur £982 / £1,228 £1,021 / £1,277
Tier 1 Graduate Entrepreneur £349 / £474 £363 / £493
Tier 2 – 3 years £587 / £677 £610 / £704
Tier 2 – 5 years £1,174 / £1,354 £1,220 / £1,408
Sponsorship License Application  £536 £536
Tier 4 £335 / £457 £348 / £475
Tier 5 £235 £244
Family Settlement (Spouse Visa) £1,464 / NA £1,523 / NA
FLR (FP, O, M, S) NA / £993 NA / £1,033
MN-1 (Registration child – British Citizenship) £973 £1,012
AN (Naturalisation – British Citizenship) £1,282 £1,330
Indefinite Leave to Remain (Settlement) £1,464 / £2,297 £1,523 / £2,389
Other dependant relative £3,250 / NA £3,250 / NA
Visit visa – short up to 6 months £89 / NA £93 / NA
Visit visa – long up to 2 years £337 / NA £350 / NA
Visit visa – long up to 5 years £612 / NA £636 / NA
Visit visa – long up to 10 years

£767 / NA

 £798 / NA
EEA Applications (all forms)

free / £65

free / £65

A full list of the new UK Immigration, Visa and Nationality Fees can be found on www.gov.uk

Other relevant changes and updates

NHS Immigration Health Surcharge will increase to £400 a year in 2018

New Fees 2018: British Passport Applications

Deadline for employers (Tier 2 sponsors) – 5 April 2018

New Online Application System launched for Tier 2 migrants and PBS dependants

Changes to the Immigration Rules 2018

Immigration Assistance

For expert advice and assistance in relation to your particular case, applicable fees and relevant immigration law requirements, please contact our immigration lawyers on Tel. +44(0)20 7822 8535, Mobile/Viber: 074 6338 2838, by e-mail: contact@sterling-law.co.uk or via our online appointment booking form.