Business visit

If you would like to visit the United Kingdom for a short stay to undertake business activities, you can apply for a Standard Visitor visa.

Requirements for a successful application: 

Applicants must satisfy UK Visas and Immigration that they:

  • will leave the UK at the end of their visit
  • will not live in the UK for extended periods through frequent or successive visits 
  • will not engage in any prohibited activities 
  • have sufficient funds to support themselves.

Permitted range of activities: 

Business visitors may undertake a wide range of activities, including but not limited to:

  • Attending meetings, conferences, seminars and interviews; give a short series of talks and speeches
  • Providing training, share skills and knowledge
  • An artist, entertainer or musician can take part in promotional activities or performances
  • A sportsperson may take part in a sports tournament or sports event.
  • Prospective entrepreneurs who can show support from a registered venture capitalist firm may come to the UK for discussions to secure funding to join, set up, or take over a UK business.

Restrictions 

Business visitors cannot:

  • do paid or unpaid work 
  • claim public funds 
  • do a course of study that lasts longer than 6 months
  • marry or register a civil partnership.

How To Apply/ Fees

The application must be made online. The decision is made within 3 weeks. The visa costs £95.

Can this visa be extended?

This visa cannot be extended and does not count towards settlement. Applicants can apply for a long-term Standard Visitor visa that lasts 2, 5 or 10 years. Successful applicants can stay for a maximum of 6 months on each visit.

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