Elderly Dependent Visa

One of the strongest misconception related to immigration is to assume that only direct family members can apply for Family visa to the United Kingdom. Direct family members usually imply fiancé, spouse, child, parent. However, according to the UK Immigration regulations, a person can apply for Family visa if he is ‘an adult person coming to the UK to be cared for by a relative’. Care can be provided by such relatives as a parent, grandchild, brother, sister, son, daughter or others who are living in the UK.

Certainly, there is a number of requirements applied to the caregiver in the UK, namely: 

  • to be living in the UK permanently;

  • to be a British citizen;

  • to be settled in the UK;

  • to have refugee status or humanitarian protection in the UK.

Adults who are eligible for this type of visa will have to prove to they are an essential need for long-term care due to a serious health condition, disability or advanced age. One of the most important requirements for the applicant is that he is not able to receive such treatment in his home country because it is not available or not affordable. However, one limitation for the applicant is applied – he cannot claim public funds for at least 5 years period. It means that the applicant will not be able to pretend to most benefits, tax credits or disability living allowance that are paid by the state. This is the Receiving party (British caregiver) who is taking responsibility for the applicant in all financial matters. To apply for Family visa as an adult dependent relative, the Applicant must be located outside the UK and the age must be 18 or over. If the paperwork was done correctly and the applicant was lucky enough to obtain a family visa as an adult dependent relative, his stay in the UK is considered as unlimited, as long as he joined British family living in the UK without a breach of continuity.

It should be noted that the application process is rather complex, which requires much attention and knowledge. The applicant will have to prepare not only his personal information consisted of at least 16 documents but also nearly the same amount of documents for his Receiving party not including proof of relationship with the British caregiver. The best way to cope with the paperwork is to ask an experienced lawyer for legal assistance. This way, the applicant will be ensured that all paperwork is completed correctly, which increases chances for a positive result in application consideration. Sterling Law highly recommends requesting legal assistance from qualified and licensed lawyers, who have long-term practice in immigration law and will be able to find the right solution in any unpredicted circumstances.

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Dependant Visa Dependant Visa

One of the strongest misconceptions related to immigration is to assume that only direct family members can apply for a family visa to the United Kingdom. Direct family members usually imply fiancé, spouse, child, parent.

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Child Dependant Visa Child Dependant Visa

UK citizens and those who are settled in the UK may be eligible to bring their children to the UK to live with them. The requirements for candidates vary on the basis of their age and place of birth. Usually at least one of the parents has to be settled in the UK in order for the child to apply for a dependent visa.

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Fiance Visa Fiance Visa

The Fiance Visa is designed to enable individuals to enter the UK to marry or enter into a civil partnership with their UK-based partner. The applicant and their partner both need to be 18 or over.

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Dependent Parent Visa Dependent Parent Visa

Your parents may be able to apply for a dependant visa to live with you in the UK. They would be applying under the Adult dependent relative category. The purpose of the Adult Dependent Relative (ADR) Visa is to allow an individual with ongoing care needs to live with a relative who is living permanently in the UK

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Spouse/Partner Visa Spouse/Partner Visa

A Spouse visa allows you to enter or remain in the UK as a partner. To qualify, you must meet certain requirements. A Spouse visa is initially granted for 2.5 years. After this period you will need to extend you visa if you wish to remain in the UK.

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