Tier 5 Youth Mobility Scheme Visa

The Tier 5 (Youth Mobility Scheme) is a great opportunity for young people from designated countries or territories who wish to live in the UK for up to 2 years.

The eligibility requirements are based on nationality, age, and financial capabilities.

Age 

An applicant must be aged 30 or under on the date of application.

Who can apply for the Youth mobility scheme visa (formerly Tier 5):

British Overseas Citizens, British Overseas Territories Citizens, or British Nationals as defined by the British Nationality Act 1981 can apply for this scheme

or

Nationals or citizens of a country or the holders of a passport issued by:

  • Australia
  • Canada
  • Hong Kong
  • Japan
  • Monaco
  • New Zealand
  • Republic of Korea
  • San Marino
  • Taiwan.

Importantly, Prospective Tier 5 Youth Mobility visa applicants who are national of Taiwan, South Korea and Hong Kong will need to be picked from an annual lottery for available quotas.

Financial requirements for Youth mobility scheme visa

The applicant must have funds of £2,530 for a 28-day period and not have any children aged under 18 who are either living with them or financially dependent upon them.

Work conditions of Youth mobility scheme visa applicants:

Successful applicants are allowed to work in the UK but subject to certain restrictions:

  • They cannot be employed as a professional sportsperson
  • They cannot be self-employed, except when the following conditions are met:
  1. the person has no premises, other than their home.
  2. the total value of any equipment used in business does not exceed  £5,000,
  3. the person has no employees.

Youth mobility scheme visa application process and fees:

Applicants should apply online. It costs £244 to apply unless premium services are used, which are paid separately. The application can be made 6 months before travel. The decision is usually made within 3 weeks.

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Services
Talent and Work Visas Talent and Work Visas

Every year, about 190,000 work-related visas are granted to foreign specialists from around the world. This number undoubtedly demonstrates how dynamic and promising the UK labour market is. If you want to come to the UK to work and meet eligibility requirements, you can apply to the following visas

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We have broad experience working with private clients, advising and representing their rights in legal institutions on various matters, such as: relocating to the UK, family member’s relocation, skilled immigration, obtaining permanent residence, or British citizenship.

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Tier 2 Intra-Company Transfer Visa Tier 2 Intra-Company Transfer Visa

This route is for established workers of multinational companies who are being transferred by their overseas company to do a skilled role for a linked entity in the UK.

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