Family Reunion

If an individual has Refugee Status or Humanitarian Protection, they may be able to bring their partner/spouse and children to the UK. This is known as a ‘refugee family reunion’.

Eligibility Criteria for a family reunion application. 

An applicant’s partner or child may join the applicant if:

  • they were part of a family before they were forced to leave their country.

  • The applicant has refugee status, 5 years’ humanitarian protection or settlement granted on protection grounds. 

A family reunion applicant will be refused if the applicant is under 18 and has not received a decision on their asylum claim.

Eligibility Requirements for Partners for a family reunion application.  

The applicant and their partner must be in a genuine relationship. The applicant must prove that they are either married or in a civil partnership.

If the applicant is not married or in a civil partnership, their partner can still join them if:

  • the applicant was given refugee status or humanitarian protection on or after 9 October 2006 

  • The applicant lived in a relationship like in a marriage or civil partnership for 2 years and the applicant been given refugee status or humanitarian protection on or after 9 October 2006 

The applicant and their partner must intend to live together and continue their relationship after they apply

What does “genuine relationship” mean in a family reunion application?

To avoid a refusal, the applicant must submit adequate and sufficient information, proving that the relationship is genuine. The Home Office’s Guidance suggests that cohabitation, shared financial responsibilities (tenancy agreements, a joint bank account and utility bill on both their names) and plans for the future are good evidence.

Eligibility Requirements for Children for a family reunion application. 

The child must:

  • be under 18

  • going to live with the applicant and their partner 

  • not married or in a civil partnership. 

How to Apply for Family Reunion and Fees.

Family members must submit their applications online and complete the application form VAF4A with Appendix 4. Applications can be made in the UK and outside the UK.

The applicant’s partner and child can apply in the UK only if:

  • the applicant has refugee status or humanitarian protection in the UK 

  • Family members making their first application to stay with the applicant and they are in the UK 

  • Family members can prove their relationship predates the applicant’s departure from their home country because of persecution. 

There is no fee for applying for a family reunion. The decision is usually made within 12 weeks.

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We will ensure your business operation are fully compliant, saving you time and money so that you can concentrate on your company growth, and we’ll take care of the rest. Let us know how we can help you by choosing one of the services below. Not sure what you need? Not to worry, ask your questions by filling in the form below, and we’ll get back to you with the answers.

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Asylum Asylum

There are other types of cases, which are considered as complicated ones. Sterling Law is proud of the number of cases, it has helped its clients to succeed in. They refer to Human rights protection or claiming asylum in the UK.

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Refugee Protection Refugee Protection

The reasons for seeking asylum can include but not limited to poverty, lack of access to healthcare, education, water, food, housing, the consequences of environmental degradation and climate change etc. International law clearly states that people have a human right to immigrate to other states.

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Settlement Settlement

The 1951 United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugee defines a refugee as follows:  

‘person who owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.

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Humanitarian Protection Humanitarian Protection

The humanitarian protection policy was introduced in April 2003 to replace the policy on Exceptional Leave to Remain. The policy objective is to grant humanitarian protection and to provide protection and a period of limited leave to those who require protection but do not qualify for refugee status.

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